Obituaries

Compiled by Caroline Buttimer, Lauren Flemming, and Lesley Onstott

Alumni obituaries should be sent directly to the Alumni Records office so that the information can be verified and information on the alumnus updated. Records will then send the information to GM for publication. It can take three to six months, or more depending on volume, for an obituary to appear on the magazine web site.

You may email obits to records@uga.edu or mail them to the Alumni Records Dept, 394 S. Milledge Ave., Athens GA 30602.

1925–1929

Fred Bryant (BSC ’29) of Savoy, Ill., died June 12, 2008, at the age of 100. During his college years at UGA, Bryant worked in the steel mills of Pittsburgh to pay his tuition. After graduation, he began his career at the W.T. Grant Company as a management trainee. He soon had a successful career as store manager and the company moved him to either open new stores or increase sales at others. His career was interrupted by a short stint in the U.S. Army during World War II, when he was stationed in Greenville, S.C. Bryant worked with the Grant Co. for 37 years before his retirement in 1967. At age 57, he studied securities investment and became a stockbroker, beginning his second successful career that lasted over 14 years with the Illinois Company in Champaign. He is survived by his wife, a son, a daughter and many loved ones.

1930–1934

Katherine Hattaway (AB ’34) of Watkinsville died June 16, 2008. A retired teacher who took pride in sponsoring the One Act Play, Hattaway retired with Terrell County Schools. She was an enthusiastic bridge player and a member of Christ United Methodist Church, Albany. She is survived by many loved ones.

Frank Hamilton Phinizy (BS ’30) of Nashville, Tenn., died Aug. 13. He spent his early insurance career in India and Burma before settling down in Nashville in 1938. He was predeceased by his wife of 69 years, Ellen Trull Phinizy. He is survived by his children, DeLacy Phinizy Sarantos, Donna Irvine Phinizy and Frank H. Phinizy, along with five grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. His body was donated to the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

1935–1939

Mary Woolford Lawrence (AB ’35) of Lookout Mountain, Tenn., died Oct. 4. After graduating from the University of Georgia, Lawrence worked for the National Youth Administration and was field director for the Girl Scouts prior to World War II. After the war began, she was a staff assistant with the Red Cross in the Central Pacific. When the war ended, she served as executive secretary of the Hamilton County Tuberculosis Association. She was an active volunteer with the Junior League, Lookout Mountain Community Aid, Family Service Agency, In-As-Much Mission and Senior Neighbors. Lawrence was an avid tennis player and won a National Senior Women’s title at the age of 88. She was a communicant of the Church of the Good Shepherd Episcopal. She was preceded in death by her husband, Joseph S. Lawrence Sr. She is survived by two children, Joseph S. Lawrence Jr. and Dr. Mary Katherine Lawrence.

Fred C. Gragg (BSF ’36) of Mobile, Ala., died Oct. 24. Gragg graduated from the University of Georgia with a bachelor’s degree in forestry. His 43-year career with International Paper Company began in Georgetown, S.C., and in 1964 he moved to Mobile, Ala., and was given responsibility for all of the company’s woodlands operations in the South. He was elected vice president of International Paper Company in 1966 and served in that capacity until 1973, when he moved to New York to direct the company’s industry affairs program. He was involved with the Forest Farmers Association and the Southern Forest Institute. He was a fellow and golden member of the Society of American Foresters. In 1987, the Fred C. Gragg Nursery, a state-of-the-art pine seedling nursing program, was dedicated to him in Bluff City, Ark.; in 2000, the nursery celebrated the planting of the billionth seedling. Gragg was named the distinguished alumnus of the University of Georgia’s Warnell School of Forest Resources in 2004. He was a member of the Anthony Forest Products board of directors and director emeritus. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Beverly Louise Gragg. He is survived by his wife, Anne Hammons Gragg, and his daughter, Patricia Gragg.

David Crenshaw Barrow Jr. (LLB ’38) of Savannah died Oct. 21. Barrow earned his law degree at the University of Georgia, where he was a member of the ROTC Cavalry. In 1940, he joined the Army First Armored Division at Fort Knox, Ky., as a lieutenant. He served four years in the European Theater during World War II. After training in Ireland and England, he fought in the North African campaign, where he received a Bronze Star. Later, he fought in the Italian campaign and was part of the invasion at Anzio. He came home in 1946 as a lieutenant colonel and served with the Army Reserves for 22 years. He practiced law as an attorney for First Federal Savings and Loan Bank until he retired in 1978. Barrow was a communicant of Christ Church, where he served as a verger and on the vestry for many years. He was a member of St. Andrew’s Society of Savannah and the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Georgia. He was an avid follower of the Georgia Bulldogs and had a keen interest in Scottish history. He enjoyed writing ballad poems about the Bulldogs and the Scots, and for many years, he was referred to as the “Poet Laureate” of the Georgia Bulldog Club and the St. Andrew’s Society. Barrow was a direct descendant of Arthur Middleton, who signed the Declaration of Independence from South Carolina. Barrow is survived by his wife of 61 years, Elizabeth Waring Barrow, and his three children, Elizabeth S. Barrow, David C. Barrow III and Charles W. Barrow, along with five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

Marion Price Elkin (BSHE ’38) of Sandersville died on Sept. 9. Elkin worked as a home demonstration agent in Columbia County and Toombs County until 1945. Her husband, Benjamin Elkin of Wallace, N.C., was in the pickling manufacturing business. She later taught home economics in North Carolina public schools until her retirement in 1975, during which time she earned many accolades and a reputation as a distinguished and accomplished educator. She was a member of the University of Georgia President’s Club, Duplin County Retired Teachers Association, First Baptist Church, and the Duplin County Association of University Women. She was also a lifelong member of Washington County Georgia Historical Society. In addition, she was part of the 1972-1973 National Register of Prominent Americans, the 4-H Girls Club of Georgia and Pleasant Hill Baptist Church. Elkin endowed several scholarships, one of which the University of Georgia awards each year to a deserving student from Columbia, Johnson or Washington County. Included among the others is a scholarship at James Sprunt Community College in Kenansville, N.C., and another at Trident Technical College in Charleston, S.C., in memory of her brother, John Hugh Price. In 2000, Elkin returned to Georgia to be near her home place in Pringle and lived at Tennille Retirement Home. She later moved to Heritage Inn in Sandersville, Ga.

William H. Inman (M ’38) of Waycross died Aug. 27. He was an agent with Georgia Farm Bureau Insurance and served 16 years as clerk of the superior court in Ware County. He was a member of the Waycross Exchange Club, Waycross Shrine Club, Waycross Masonic Lodge No. 305 F&AM, Satilla Livestock Association and Georgia Stockyard Association. He was an ambassador of the Hasan Temple and received the Liberty Bell Award. He was also a member of New Prospect United Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife, Nell B. Inman, his son, Bill Inman Jr., and his daughter, Cindy Coppage.

Olene C. Bogle (ABEd ’39, MA ’43) of Zebulon died Sept. 28. After earning her education degree from the University of Georgia, Bogle was an elementary school teacher for over 40 years. Before retiring from Orrs Elementary School in Griffin, she taught at New Hope School, Zebulon Elementary, and Liberty Gwyn. She often said, “I would be teaching today if I could.” She was a member of New Hope Baptist Church. She loved flowers and enjoyed gardening. She was preceded in death by her husband, Frank Bogle. She is survived by many nieces and nephews.

Sara Faust Chandler (BSEd ’39) of Crawford died on Aug. 27. Chandler was born March 6, 1908 in Oglethorpe County. She graduated from Georgia State Normal School as well as the University of Georgia and taught afterwards for 35 years. She was a former Teacher of the Year in Oglethorpe County, where she spent most of her career as a teacher. Chandler was a member of Crawford Baptist Church and Oglethorpe County Retired Educators. She was a devoted mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and friend. She was preceded in death by her husband, John Telford Chandler Sr.

Dorothy S. Denson (BSHE ’39) of Madison, Fla., died May 28.

Dorothy W. Folan (ABEd ’39) of Annandale, Va., died April 1. After graduating from the University of Georgia, Folan lived in a variety of places, including Florida, Alabama, New York, Georgia, Connecticut, Texas, Virginia, Germany and Japan. She is preceded in death by her husband of 53 years, Col. John B. Folan.

Charles Rupert Franklin (BSF ’39) of Livingston, Texas, died April 24.

Edward Smith Scott (BSA ’39) of Austell died Oct. 16. Scott graduated from both the University of Georgia and Colorado State University with degrees in animal husbandry and agriculture. While in Colorado, he worked on a cattle ranch and returned to Georgia with a love of horses and the great outdoors. He enjoyed history, the American Indians and researching his family heritage. Scott was a historian on the Civil War and told many stories about his ancestors’ involvement in it. He loved politics and corresponded often with congressional leaders on a variety of topics, winning senatorial awards for his writings. Scott is survived by his three children, Gloria, John and Randy Scott.

Daniel L. Stephens Jr. (BSA ’39, MEd ’52) of Newnan died Sept. 8. Stephens graduated valedictorian from TyTy High School in Tift County before earning his associate’s degree from Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College. He went on to earn his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the University of Georgia in agriculture and education. While at UGA, he was selected to Phi Beta Kappa and Kappa Delta Pi national honorary societies. Stephens served as a photographic reconnaissance instructor in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II. His teaching career spanned more than 38 years; he taught vocational agriculture at Glenwood High School and then at Jenkins County High School. In 1991, he received the Jenkins County Chamber of Commerce’s lifetime service award for service to the agricultural industry. He also served on the State Curriculum Committee for Georgia High Schools and was named the Georgia Vocational Education’s Outstanding Educator of the Year in 1997. He was a member of the Peachtree City United Methodist Church and the Georgia Retired Teachers Association. In 2001, he was inducted into the Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame as a charter member. Before relocating to Peachtree City in 1998, Stephens and his late wife had been residents of Millen for over 40 years. Stephens valued the love of family and friends, hard work and the importance of unselfish giving and devotion to church and community. He was preceded in death by his wife of 57 years, Annie Laurie Fowler Stephens. He is survived by his only child, J. Daniel Stephens.

1940–1944

Kenneth Alexander McCaskill (BSEd ’40) of Macon died Oct. 1. After graduating from Lanier High School in 1936, McCaskill attended the University of Georgia, where he was an all-sports athlete until he graduated in 1940. He went on to coach football at Athens High School from 1940-41, and his team won the state championship. He then enlisted in the U.S. Navy from 1942-46. He was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 1977 as a multi-sport athlete and coach. He is survived by his wife of 67 years, Betsy Barker McCaskill, and his children, Carrell McCaskill Cranswick, Kenny McCaskill and Charlie McCaskill.

Elizabeth B. Reddy (AB ’40) of West Palm Beach, Fla., died on Sept. 1. After graduating from the University of Georgia, Reddy lived in Savannah until moving to Florida in 1951. She is predeceased by her husband, Edward Francis Reddy, and survived by her lifetime friend and nephew-in-law, Edward Reddy Decker.

George Frank Williams Sr. (BSA ’40) of Plains died April 23.

Robert Cassels (BSC ’41) of Mattapoisett, Mass., died March 8. He attended Kirkwood Elementary School, Boys High School and UGA School of Commerce, where he graduated with a degree in business administration and was president of Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. He was also president of the junior class, Demosthenian Debating Society, a member of Gridiron Club, Blue Key Honorary Society and chairman of the board of directors of Biftad. Cassels joined the U.S. Navy after college and served in World War II from 1942 until 1945 as a lieutenant in the South Pacific. During his service, Cassels earned an American Theater Ribbon, the Pacific Asiatic Ribbon, Pre-Pearl Harbor Ribbon, Philippine Liberation Ribbon and 12 Campaign Stars. After the war, he became a commercial real estate salesman and broker and a property manager. He was a member of the Druid Hills Golf Club, MOWW, Civil War Round Table and Mattapoisett Congregational Church. Cassels was a loving man who enjoyed spending time with his family, reading history and playing tennis and golf. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Donata, and their five children.

Una Gilmer (BSEd ’41) of Rome, Ga., died Jan. 10. She was a native of Oglethorpe County and retired from the Oglethorpe School System after teaching there for 37 years. Gilmer was a member of the Retired Teachers Association, Winterville United Methodist Church and a Sunday school teacher for more than 50 years. She is survived by many loved ones.

Col. Robert Lee Jackson Jr. (BSA ’41) of Greensboro died May 29, 2008. Jackson served his country in the U.S. Army for 33 years. He graduated 2nd lieutenant from UGA in 1941 as class president and member of the blue Key and Gridiron Clubs. During WWII, Jackson was a member of the 101st Airborne Division that landed in Normandy at Utah Beach for D-Day. He spent time in France and ended the war at Burches Gaden. He moved to England, where he enrolled at the University of Cambridge. Jackson then returned to the U.S., receiving his master’s degree at Cornell University. He graduated from Command General Staff College at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan. He remained on active duty service during the Korean and Vietnam Wars, traveling extensively in Germany and Japan. He retired in 1971 as a member of the general’s staff. After retirement, he began his career as a broker with Lakeside Realty. He retired from real estate on Lake Oconee. He is survived by many loved ones.

Archie S. Rushton (BSA ’41, MEd ’53, EdD ’56) of Gainesville, Ga., died May 31, 2008. Upon graduating from the University of Georgia, Rushton was the first recipient of the Kellogg Foundation Fellowship in Higher Education and the first person to receive the Doctorate of Education in Higher Education Administration. A WWII veteran, he served in the Pacific, taught college courses to soldiers during the occupation of Japan, and wrote a column for the Atlanta Constitution. He began his professional career in Buena Vista, continuing in Daren, Laurens County and Elbert County. He served as principal and basketball coach of Brewton High School and Wilkes High School; director of the UGA Off-Campus Center in Marietta, predecessor of Kennesaw State University; began the Tennessee Community College System, for which he opened three colleges; and served as president of Northern Virginia Community College in Falls Church, Va. From 1948 until 2005, Rushton ran Chaber Farms. A founding partner of Rushton Associates Realty and Rushton Construction Company, Archie was honored as a member of the Million Dollar Club by State Farm Insurance Company. Rushton taught Sunday School for more than 70 years at various Methodist churches. As mayor of Dexter, Rushton was a leader dedicated to education and student development. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, two sons, a daughter, grandchildren and many loved ones.

Bettye Johnson Rushton (BSHE ’41, MEd ’55) of Gainesville, Ga., died on Sept. 12. She joined her husband of 67 years, Archie Sime Rushton (BSA ’41, MEd ’53, EdD ’56) who died on May 31. Mrs. Rushton was born on March 26, 1920, in Fort Smith, Ark., and lived there until she was six, at which time her family moved to Jacksonville, Fla. When she was 11, her family moved again, to Atlanta. She attended East Rivers School and graduated from North Fulton High School. Rushton attended the University of Tennessee, where she was a member of Sigma Kappa sorority. In her junior year, she transferred to the University of Georgia, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in home economics and later a master’s in education with a specialty in reading. Rushton met her husband at UGA, where they fell in love not only with each other but also with their alma mater. Their love of education and UGA was instilled in their children as well, all of whom graduated from the university. During World War II, Rushton’s husband served in the Pacific while she coached women’s basketball at the local high school. She had never played basketball as a team sport before, but soon mastered the game and became a lifelong supporter of women’s basketball. She also invested her life in education, beginning her career as a home economics teacher in McIntosh County. She later went on to teach in several other counties in Georgia, as well as in Nashville and Falls Church, Va. She also taught at the Demonstration School at UGA. Rushton was a lifelong member of the United Methodist Church, becoming a member in every community in which she lived. In recognition of Mr. and Mrs. Rushton’s lifelong investment in education, their love of UGA and support of basketball and football, their children endowed The Archie Sime and Bettye Johnson Rushton Family Scholarship at the university in 2007.

Harold Saye (BSC ’41) of Athens died April 22. He was born on Aug. 29, 1920, and graduated from Athens High School. He received his business degree from the University of Georgia in 1941 and was a member of Alpha Kappa Psi as well as a cavalry officer in Army ROTC. In 1941, Saye was commissioned as a 2nd lieutenant and served until the end of World War II. He worked in the automobile business in Athens from 1948 until 1969, both at Downs Motor Company and Hadaway Motors. He later joined the business services division of UGA as a manager of expenditure control, where he retired in 1985. Saye was preceded in death by his wife of 51 years, Margery Williams Saye.

George Cress (BFA ’42, MFA ’50) of Chattanooga, Tenn., died Jan. 1. Cress was born in Anniston, Ala., on April 7, 1921. After receiving degrees from both UGA and Emory University, he moved to Chattanooga in 1951 to teach for the University of Chattanooga for 56 years. He served as chair of the department of art and was Guerry Professor Emeritus of Art. Cress’s paintings have been exhibited across North America and his artistic creative force was unique and prolific. He received several awards and recognitions both as an artist and art educator. His character was most transparent in his many acts of kindness, generosity, loyalty and love for family, friends and students.

Joseph A. Greene (AB ’42) of Avon, Conn., died Oct. 21. After graduating from the University of Georgia in 1942, Greene enlisted in the U.S. Navy. He was commissioned as ensign one year later and served on minesweepers along the Atlantic coast and later as a ship operations officer at the naval base in Dutch Harbor, Alaska, during World War II. He was honorably discharged with the rank of lieutenant in 1945. Greene worked at Bendix Aviation, where he specialized in meteorological instruments and developed a lifelong interest in weather science. He also worked extensively in the automobile industry and became the owner and president of Greene Ford Sales of Torrington in 1959. He served as director of the Connecticut Automobile Dealers Association. He operated the Ford dealership until his retirement in 1985. During his retirement, he traveled extensively with his wife, Thelma Greene, and worked as an arbitrator with the Better Business Bureau and as a volunteer Medicare benefits advisor for Avon. He was a member of the Beth El Temple, West Hartford. He is survived by his wife, three children, Alan S. Greene, Marilyn G. Rigby and Kenneth J. Greene, and nine grandchildren.

Paul W. Groom (BSF ’42) of Wewahitchka, Fla., died Sept. 12. Groom attended Emory University and earned his bachelor’s degree in forestry from the University of Georgia. He spent his summers working as a counselor at a camp for disadvantaged youth from New York City. After graduating, he worked with the state of Georgia’s Division of Forestry and later accepted a job with St. Joseph Land and Development Company as the unit forester at the Wetappo unit and moved to Wewahitchka, Fla. He was then promoted to manager of the St. Joseph Land and Development Company, and he led the management of the largest private land holdings in Florida. He was an active leader for Boy Scouts of America and served as a director of the Forest Farmer’s Association of Georgia. He was a member of the executive board of the Florida Forestry Association. He retired from the company in 1991 after 40 years of service. Groom was preceded in death by his son, Henry I. Rish Jr. He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Anna Joyce Groom.

Maurice K. Horowitz (BSA ’42) of Atlanta died May 19. In high school, Horowitz was a tennis champion. He attended Notre Dame University for a year before moving to Georgia. He earned a bachelor’s degree in agriculture from the University of Georgia in 1942. It was at UGA that he met his future bride, Ida Erbesfield. When a 4-H classification prevented him from fighting in World War II, the couple joined the civilian war effort and spent a year in Alabama manufacturing munitions until the U.S. Navy sent them to Pearl Harbor. There, Horowitz worked in the Capitan of the Yard’s office for two years. After World War II, he co-owned a restaurant in Roanoke, Va., and sold coffee in Georgia before joining Libby’s as regional manager of frozen foods. In 1953, he founded M.K. Horowitz Company, a frozen food brokerage to sell to Southeastern supermarkets and restaurants. Over the course of the next 35 years, he built one of Atlanta’s most respected frozen food brokerages with more than a dozen employees representing brands such as Libby’s, Stouffer’s, Welch’s, Mrs. Smith’s Pies and Icelandic Fish. Horowitz was an award-winning salesman beloved by customers and suppliers both, and he was a top American broker for Coldwater Seafood’s Icelandic Fish. The company invited him to visit Iceland in 1962, and four years later, Iceland’s government named him its first Atlanta Honorary Consul for the Southeast. His exemplary service led to a promotion in 1986 to Honorary Consul General, and in 1987, the Icelandic president bestowed on him one of Iceland’s highest honors: Knighthood in the Order of the Falcon. A former president of the Atlanta Food Brokers Association, Horowitz also served as regional director of the National Food Brokers Association and was National Chairman of its Frozen Food Committee. He was appointed to the advisory board of the National Frozen Food Association and served on the advisory board of Coldwater Seafood Company for many years. In 1968, the Frozen Food Council of Georgia named him Mr. Frozen Food of Georgia, for his “pioneer work in frozen food merchandising and excellence in service to the community.” After selling his business in 1988, Horowitz and his son ran East Coast Sales Company, importing frozen fish and other products to sell to Atlanta area restaurants. He was a member of Ahavath Achim Synagogue and Fulton Masonic Lodge 216 for 55 years. He was also a Shriner and a member of Scottish Rite. Throughout the 1980s, he delivered Meals on Wheels until he could no longer drive. He is survived by his wife of 66 years and his children, Jane Horowitz Bick and Robert Horowitz.

Harold Watters King (BSAE ’42) of Adairsville died Oct. 15. King graduated from Adairsville High School and Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College. He then graduated from the University of Georgia in 1942 with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural engineering. He served in the Air Force during World War II as an engineering officer and was in charge of the hangars at Burtonwood Air Base in England. He was discharged in 1946 with the rank of major. He and his brother, F. Martin King, owned King Milling Co. in Rome. He later became the sole owner of the company, along with River Bend Farm in Floyd County. In addition, King also owned Veri-Best Egg Co. in Rome. He was interested in archeological findings, and the King Site located in Northwest Georgia was named for him. He was a member of the Nine O’clock Social Organization and was an officer of the Rome-Floyd County Bulldog Club. After moving to Athens-Clarke County in 1981, King was appointed to a three-year term on the Farm and Home Administration Committee for Clarke and Oconee counties. He was a member of First Presbyterian Church and the University of Georgia’s President’s Club. King is survived by his wife of 59 years, Frances Broach King, his children, Harold B. King, Helen K. Kelley and Frances K. Rauschenberg, and two grandchildren.

Walter H. Levie Sr. (M ’42) of LaFayette died Oct. 2. Levie spent some of his childhood in Korea with his missionary parents before returning to the U.S. in 1936. He then attended the University of Georgia before matriculating to the Atlanta Southern School of Dentistry, an affiliate of Emory University, from which he graduated in 1944. After being honorably discharged from the U.S. Army in 1946, he joined his father’s dental practice in LaFayette. He was awarded a lifetime membership in the American Dental Association and the Georgia Dental Association for his service to the dental profession for 60 years. Levie was named Citizen of the Year in 1991 by the LaFayette Chamber of Commerce. He was involved in numerous civic and church activities and was a member and former deacon of the First Baptist Church of LaFayette. His passion for farming led to innovative ideas that contributed to the agricultural community. He enjoyed gardening and spending time with his family. He was preceded in death by his wife of 54 years. He his survived by his three children and many grandchildren.

Otis Edmund Smith Jr. (BSPH ’42) of Rockmart died Sept. 1. Smith graduated from Tallapoosa High School in 1937 and West Georgia College in 1939. He went on to graduate from the College of Pharmacy at the University of Georgia in 1942. Smith was a veteran of World War II and received a Bronze Star for Meritorious Service with the 95th Infantry Division Medical Corps. In 1947, he opened Smith & Lockwood Drugstore in Rockmart with Max Lockwood. They opened a second pharmacy in 1965. Smith was a member of the First Baptist Church of Rockmart for 61 years where he served as deacon. He was on the board of directors of the Rockmart Bank for 10 years and was president of the Rockmart-Aragon Chamber of Commerce in 1971 and 1972. He later became one of the organizers of the Rockmart Industrial Development Corporation and continued as its chairman for many years. He was a member of the Rockmart Rotary Club and helped sponsor the Bremen Rotary Club. The Georgia Pharmacist Association honored Smith at their 1992 convention for 50 years of service to pharmacy. He was also presented with the Hall of Fame Award by the Rockmart Chamber of Commerce for 1980-1981 in recognition of distinguished and dedicated service. Smith was preceded in death by his wife of 56 years, Winnie Bennett Smith. He is survived by his two sons, Steven Bennett Smith and Dr. Paul E. Smith, and many grandchildren and loved ones.

Warren “Pete” Gibson Cutts Jr. (AB ’43) of Brandon, Fla., died on Aug. 26. Cutts graduated from North Georgia College before attending the University of Georgia. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He later worked as the city editor for the Marietta Journal and as coordinator of veterans’ education in Spalding County. He went on to earn his Ph.D. in education from Syracuse University in New York. Over the course of his prolific career, Cutts taught at Watauga Public Schools, Appalachia State Teachers College and Kent University and was the first reading specialist at the Department of Education in Washington, D.C., before later joining Florida Atlantic University as a reading professor. He was a member of the First Baptist Church of Brandon and enjoyed singing in the choir. He also enjoyed fishing and canoeing with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Margaret Jackson Cutts, their six children and many loved ones.

Mary Neal (BSHE ’43) of Evans died Aug. 17. Neal was born in Ashland on Aug. 24, 1910. She graduated from Reinhardt College in 1943 and went on to attend the University of Georgia at the same time as all seven of her siblings. Neal graduated with a degree in home economics and became a home demonstration expert. She taught school for six years and worked as a catering assistant in Gray after retirement. Neal was an active member of the Pilot Club International as well as in her local church. In 1973, the Gray Methodist Church honored Neal for her leadership within the church by awarding her the Quiet Disciple Award. She will be remembered for her hospitality, love of quotes and jokes, her lifetime of care giving and as the matriarch of the Neal family.

Capt. James Parady (M ’43) of Chandler, Ariz., died Jan. 31.

James Williams Jr. (BBA ’43) of Decatur died Oct. 10. While at the University of Georgia, Williams was a member of the Kappa Alpha Order Fraternity, for which he served as president, and Blue Key National Honor Fraternity. He was manager of the football team that won the 1942 Rose Bowl and became national champions. He graduated from Midshipman’s School at Columbia University and served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, captaining LCT 581, which took part in the invasion of Normandy. When he returned home, he worked in the lumber and building materials business. He retired as manager of dealer sales for Randall Brothers Inc. He was an avid gardener and shared his bounty with family and neighbors. He was a member of Decatur First United Methodist Church, where he taught Sunday school and served on the administrative board. He is survived by his wife, Martha Fambro Williams, and his two children, Jean Williams Middleton and Charles Fambro Williams.

Frances Wroton (AB ’43) of St. Simons Island died Jan. 15, 2008. An active member for more than 20 years of Wesley United Methodist Church, Wroton worked with child welfare, first with the American Red Cross and later for Richmond County in North Carolina. She is survived by her husband of 58 years and many loved ones.

Henry Allison (BSA ’44) of Cleveland, Ga., died June 8, 2007. He was born in White County on Sept. 14, 1924. Allison served with the U.S. Army during World War II and earned the rank of sergeant. He operated Stovall’s 5 & 10 Cent Store for many years in Cleveland and was an active member of Cleveland United Methodist Church for 70 years. He was also a member of the American Legion, Woodmen of the World Insurance Fraternity, the March of Dimes, the Yonah Masonic Lodge, Yaraab Temple, a member and organizer of the Georgia Mountain planning and development commission and a member of several fund drives. Allison was a volunteer for the White County Fire Department, a 32nd degree Scottish Rite Mason, past president of Cleveland Kiwanis Club, former chairman of the Cleveland Housing Authority and a Boy Scouts of America WEBLO leader. Allison also belonged to the Cleveland Planning and Zoning Commission, the White County Chamber of Commerce and the White County Development Authority. He was an organizer and charter member of the White County Bank and a member and past director of the White County Farm Bureau, the Georgia Cattleman’s Association and the White County Historical Society. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Mary Anna, and their three children.

Dr. Osgood Bateman (BSA ’44) of Sandersville died March 8. He received his bachelor’s degree in agriculture from the University of Georgia and later attended Auburn University School of Veterinary Science, where he received his doctoral degree in veterinary medicine. Bateman served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He was a retired veterinary doctor and owned and operated Washington County Animal Hospital for 52 years. Bateman was a member of the Sandersville United Methodist Church and Methodist Men’s Group and served on the board of directors of the Sandersville United Methodist Church Foundation. Bateman was an active member of the Washington County Commissioners, the Washington County Board of Health, the Washington County Chamber of Commerce and the Washington County Industrial Development Authority. He was also involved in the Sandersville Rotary Club, was a Paul Harris Fellow and a member of the Washington County Historical Society. He is survived by his wife, Frances, and their children.

Barbara O. Davies (AB ’44) of Fairfax died Aug. 28. She was preceded in death by her husband, John M. Davies III, and her daughter, Susan Porter Davies. She is survived by her children, John M. Davies IV and Carolyn Wesley, and three grandchildren.

John Henry Haslam Sr. (BBA ’44) of Savannah died on Aug. 28. He was a native of Savannah and a 1940 graduate of Benedictine Military School. He retired from the accounting firm of Hancock Askew & Co. LLP in 1997 after 50 years in the accounting profession. He was a member of the Hibernian Society and served as president from 1993-1994. He was a founding father of St. Vincent’s Academy school board in 1976 and was a founding member of the Sinn Fein Society when it was organized in 1958. He was also a founding and honorary life member of the Knights of Columbus Council 5588. In addition to providing years of pro bono tax and accounting services to the Catholic community, he was an active member of numerous Catholic organizations, including the finance board for the Diocese of Savannah and the Notre Dame Book Store board. He was a communicant of St. Peter the Apostle Catholic Church. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Lois Cooper Haslam, and many loved ones.

Dr. James R. Jones Jr. (M ’44), nicknamed “Bulldaddy,” died Aug. 13 after a brave battle with lung cancer. He was born Dec. 9, 1923, in Thomson. He graduated from Hawkinsville High School in 1941 and attended Emory at Oxford University as well as Rinehart College before transferring to the University of Georgia. He finished medical school at the Medical College of Georgia in Athens in 1946. While he was interning at Roper Hospital in Charleston, S.C., he enlisted in the U.S. Navy and was stationed in Charleston. He and his family moved to Orlando, Fla., in 1954 and he became an OB/GYN resident at Orange Memorial Hospital. Jones was a founding member and past president of the Central Florida Obstetrical and Gynecological Society and was credited with bringing the first electronic fetal monitor to Orlando. He was a member of the Orange County Medical Society, South Orlando Kiwanis Club, Woodmen of the World and Bahia Shrine of Orlando. Jones is survived by his wife of 61 years, Allie S. Jones, and many loved ones.

JoAnn Cannon McClung (BFA ’44) of Albany, Ga., died Aug. 16. She was a native of Dawson and graduated from Albany High School in 1941. In 1944, McClung graduated from the University of Georgia, where she studied under Lamar Dodd, with a degree in fine arts. She worked at McCollum’s Photo Shop and was a member of First Baptist Church for 30 years. Five years ago, McClung joined Byne Memorial Baptist Church. She is survived by her husband, Wayne, and many loved ones.

1945–1949

Muriel Mobley Anderson (AB ’45) of Ft. Gaines died Oct. 18. After graduating from Fort Gaines High School in 1941, she attended Georgia State College for Women for two years before graduating from the University of Georgia in 1945 with a bachelor’s degree in sociology. Anderson worked at the Clay County Department of Family and Children’s Services for 19 years. Active in many and varied community affairs, she was an elder at Fort Gaines Presbyterian Church and served on the Clay County Library Board. She was truly a Southern lady, full of personality, charm and wit, and she enjoyed joking around with others and amusing them with her many stories. She was preceded in death by her husband, G. Von Anderson. She is survived by her six children, 13 grandchildren, and nine great-grandchildren.

Augusta Collins (M ’45) of Atlanta died March 15. She was a member of Phi Mu sorority while at the University of Georgia. In 1944, Collins married Richard Henry Horsey and they moved to Atlanta once he was discharged from the U.S. Navy. They had three daughters and became lifelong members of the Cathedral of St. Philip. Collins was a successful fundraiser for several non-profits and a member of the Junior League, Cherokee Garden Club and the Garden Club of America. She volunteered at Grady Hospital and served at Eggleston Hospital for more than 25 years. She also founded and owned Art Needlework of Georgia. Collins was predeceased by her first husband and later married Joseph Lester Collins, who also predeceased her. She is survived by her children and stepchildren.

Joyce Cooper Smith (AB ’45) of Rome died Oct. 4. She attended Cooper Hall School for Girls, St. Mary’s College and Shorter College. She graduated from the University of Georgia, where she was a member of Chi Omega Sorority. Smith was a member of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, where she served on the altar guild and taught Sunday school. She was a member of the National Society of Colonial Dames of America and Xavier Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She was preceded in death by her husband, Stephen D. Smith. She is survived by her four children, S. David Smith Jr., Wright W. Smith, Mark C. Smith and Sarah (Sally) Smith Lawrence, along with eight grandchildren.

Jennie Gross Boyd (BSHE ’46) of Thomson died Sept. 18. After graduating from Thomson High School, she earned her degree at the University of Georgia. Boyd was a member of Thomson First Baptist Church. She is survived by many loved ones.

Betty Carolyn Jones Harris (BSEd ’46) of Carrollton died Aug. 23. Harris was born in Carroll County on Dec. 27, 1924. Born legally blind, Harris’ determination and strong will helped her overcome the odds of learning, graduating “Most Likely to Succeed” from Carrollton High School in 1942 and earning a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Georgia in 1946. She retired from teaching in 1979, after teaching at Bremen Elementary School for 30 years. Harris remained active in the teaching society as a member of the Bremen Educators Association, National Educators Association and the Retired Teachers Association. Harris was also involved as a member of the First Christian Church of Carrollton, Civic Women’s Organization, Keenagers and the Alpha Women’s Circle. She served as a goodwill ambassador for Merrill Gardens and was elected Ms. Merrill Gardens 2006.

John Lucius Hill (LLB ’47) of Vero Beach, Fla., died Sept. 27. He graduated from Middle Georgia College before earning his law degree at the University of Georgia. He served in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II in the 8th and 9th Air Forces as a fighter pilot in the European Theater of Operations, flying more than 90 combat missions. Among his decorations and citations were the Silver Star, two Distinguished Flying Crosses, 18 Air Medals and the Distinguished Unit Citation. After the war, he worked in the claim department of Hartford Insurance Company in Atlanta. In 1972, he was promoted to the Hartford Home Office in Hartford, Conn., where he served in several positions until his retirement in 1983 as vice president and deputy director of claims. Hill and his wife then relocated to Vero Beach, where he was active as a volunteer insurance consultant to the Council on Aging and the local chapter of AARP. He was also a trustee of the Middle Georgia College Foundation, a member of the Indian River Hospital Foundation and a sponsor of the Indian River Library. He played tennis and golf and was a member of Hopmeadow Country Club in Simsbury, Conn., and Vista Royale Golf and Country Club in Vero Beach. He enjoyed travel, books, crossword puzzles and spending time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Lucinda Sue Tyler Hill, and his children, Patricia Hill Elliot, Robert Tyler Hill and Judy Anne Hill Orcutt.

John Marshall (BSF ’47) of Anderson, S.C., died June 17, 2008. A U.S. Army World War II veteran, Marshall retired from the Greenwood County Health Department after a fulfilling career.

Robert Walter Reynolds (LLB ’47) of Albany died Oct. 2. Reynolds graduated from Albany High School in 1941 and attended the University of Georgia on a football scholarship, where he was a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity. He served in the U.S. Navy for three years during World War II. After being honorably discharged, Reynolds returned to the University of Georgia and graduated with a degree in law in 1947. He was an attorney in Albany and later president and owner of Cold Applied Roofing Co., which he retired from in 2005. He was a member of Covenant Presbyterian Church, where he taught Sunday school. Reynolds was a member of the Walter H. Burt American Legion Post 30 and the Veterans of Foreign Wars. He was an avid lover of the outdoors and enjoyed gardening and playing tennis. He was predeceased by his wife of 40 years, Elizabeth Hollingsworth Reynolds. He is survived by his wife, Ermine Wingate Reynolds, and his children, Juli Reynolds Bruner, Joseph Stewart Champion Jr., Kay Champion Fuller and Holli Champion Persall.

John Ridley (BSA ’47) of Tallahassee, Fla., died Oct. 18. After graduated from Heard County High School, Ridley attended Berry College and entered the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1943. He completed 35 missions over Germany as a ball turret gunner in a B-17 and was awarded the Air Medal with four oak leaf clusters. He later graduated from the University of Georgia, where he was a member of Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity. He worked for the Georgia Department of Agriculture as an entomologist for 35 years. Before moving to Tallahassee in 2008 to be closer to family, Ridley lived in Atlanta, where he attended Clairmont Hills Baptist Church and was a member of the American Camellia Society, the Georgia Entomology Society and the North Amanda Garden Club. He was known for his gift of horticulture and enjoyed sharing his roses, camellias and tomatoes with friends and neighbors. He was predeceased by his wife, Gloria Ridley, and their two daughters, Nancy and June Ridley. He is survived by his sister, Maye Walker, and many loved ones.

Colon Stewart (M’ 47) of Crawfordville died Oct. 6. After studying agricultural and animal husbandry at UGA, he worked with the Soil Conservation Service. He received an honorable discharge from the Army Air Force after 15 months of service. He worked for Pennington Grain and Seed for 35 years before his retirement. Stewart was an active member of Crawfordville Baptist Church, where he served as a deacon. He is survived by his wife, Sybil Kenny Stewart; his children, Carol Bird, Charles Stewart, Coleen Gardner and Chip Stewart; and nine grandchildren.

Kenneth Tucker (AB ’47, MEd ’60) of Athens died March 19. He was a native of Irwin County and graduated from Ocilla High School. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Georgia in 1947 and finished his education there with a master’s degree in education. He later attended Emory University in Atlanta to receive his doctor of law degree. Tucker was a veteran of World War II and served in the European Theater from 1943 to 1946. In 1952, he began a position teaching social sciences for the Panama Canal Zone government. He was an avid tennis player and coached the Panama Canal College’s boys’ and girls’ tennis teams. After retiring in 1992, Tucker left Panama Canal College to return to Athens to his family.

Hudson L. Boyd (BSA ’48, MSA ’50) of Winchester, Va., died May 28, 2008. A World War II veteran, Boyd served in the Army Air Corps with the 14th Division Flying Tigers in China, Burma and India. Boyd was an aerospace engineer who contributed to the Polaris Missile Project, and he retired from the EPA as a chemical engineer. He is survived by his wife and many loved ones.

Mary Farrington (AB ’48) of Fort Belvoir, Va., died May 31, 2008. A devoted wife and mother, Farrington was a member of Aldersgate United Methodist Church and a volunteer for the Salvation Army. She is survived by her husband, three daughters and four grandchildren.

Hubert H. Glisson (BSA ’48) of Soperton died on Oct. 12, 2007. He was a native of Screven County and had lived in Soperton for more than 50 years. During World War II, Glisson served in the 30th Division Artillery and was awarded the Bronze Star. Glisson taught vocational agriculture in the Treutlen County School System for 35 years. He was a member of Harmony Masonic Lodge, Alee Temple and York Rite and Soperton United Methodist Church. He was preceded in death by his wife, Elsie Lois Short Glisson. He is survived by a son and a daughter, five grandchildren and a great-grandson.

Martha Beck Harmon (AB ’48) of Atlanta died May 11. Her body was donated to the Emory University School of Medicine.

James Hensley (M ’48) of Metter died Aug. 18. Hensley operated Hensley Tobacco Warehouse with the Hensley group for 40 years before retiring to farm. He was an avid sportsman and a member of the Portal Hunting Club. He enjoyed following and supporting local athletics. In addition to the University of Georgia, Hensley graduated from Georgia Military Academy and attended both Gordon Military College and the University of North Carolina. He was a member of the Kappa Alpha Order. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Jean Tillman Hensley, and his children, Jim Hensley and Jerri Wolff.

Charles Lokey Sr. (LLB ’48) of Atlanta died May 31, 2008. Lokey, who served on an ammunition ship in the Pacific arena during World War II, retired in 1970 as a captain. A member of the Gridiron Society, he practiced law with Lokey and Bowden for more than 50 years. He served as president of the Atlanta Bar Association and the Old War Horses Lawyers Club and was an associate city of Atlanta attorney. Lokey was a member of the board of Canterbury Court and was a member of the Vestry of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, the Buckhead Men’s Garden Club, the Lake Rabun Association, the Piedmont Driving Club and the Nine O’clocks. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, daughter, son and many loved ones.

Rufus Paine Sr. (BBA ’48) of Athens died June 20. Paine was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Athens and worked in the insurance and real estate business for more than 40 years. He was the owner of Paine Insurance and Realty Company and served in the Army Artillery Observation Corp during World War II in the European Theater. He is survived by his wife, Josephine, and his children and grandchildren.

John E. Ransom (BSA ’48) of Dublin died June 15, 2007. Ransom served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and was a member of the Disabled American Veterans. He was a retired postmaster for Unadilla. Ransom was a member of the National Association of Postmasters of the United States and served several times as sergeant-at-arms chairman, as well as being a past president of the Georgia chapter. He was also a member of Pinecrest Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife, Frances A. Ransom, and his children, John Ransom Jr., Pamela L. Ransom and Kim R. McFarland.

George Richards (M ’48) of Thomson died Aug. 4, 2007. Richards was a native of Augusta and a member of Sweetwater Baptist Church. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, participating in seven campaigns in the Pacific and two in the Aleutian Islands, as well as the battle at the Coral Sea. He retired from the V.A. regional office in Atlanta. Richards is survived by his wife, Bernice.

Methvin Thomson Salter III (BFA ’48, MFA ’50, EdS ’71) of Atlanta died Oct. 5. After graduating from North Fulton High School in 1943, he attended Emory University for a year before entering the U.S. Army in 1944. He served in the Philippine Islands before completing his degrees at the University of Georgia. He began his teaching career as an art teacher at Wardlaw Junior High School in South Carolina. From there, he went to LaGrange High School in Georgia and then returned to Atlanta in 1953. For the next 10 years, he taught art at Southwest High School. From 1963-1966, he served as an art administrator for Atlanta Public Schools. During this time, he taught summer art classes at several Georgia colleges. Travel was one of Salter’s greatest passions, and in 1966, he participated in the University of the Seven Seas World College Program as an art instructor and took a six-month voyage around the world. Upon returning to Atlanta, he joined the first faculty of the then-newly created Kennesaw Junior College, which would later become Kennesaw State University. He remained there until his retirement in 1990. Salter was a great patron of the arts, especially in the Southeast. As president of the Georgia Art Education Association and membership secretary of the Southeastern Art Education Association, he made significant contributions to the art world. During the 1960s and 1970s, he helped operate the Atlanta’s Artist Associate Gallery. Salter’s work was exhibited at the High Museum Art Shop, the South Carolina Museum of Art, the Gertrude Herbert Art Institute, the McIntosh Gallery and the governor’s office. His creative talents manifested themselves in many ways, and in addition to creating hundreds of paintings and watercolors, he worked with ceramics, collage and textiles. He journeyed to Cortona, Italy, to learn the technique of papermaking and studied bronze casting at the Instituto Allende in San Miguel, Mexico. He was an active member of the Friendship Force and traveled to South Korea, China and Soviet Georgia with the program. He was a lifelong member of the Peachtree Road United Methodist Church and was a member of the Harmony Sunday school class. In terms of stewardship, teaching and administrative contributions, Salter always strove to enhance the community of the church and took great pride in watching the church thrive and expand. He is survived by his wife, Teresa Lyle-Barksdale.

Herbert Jack Short (JD ’48) of Doerun died Sept. 5. Short graduated from Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College before earning his law degree at the University of Georgia. He also served in the Army’s 375th Fighter Squadron during the Normandy-Northern France air offensive, the Ardennes-Rhineland campaign and the Central European campaign. Short served four terms in the Georgia House of Representatives and was Colquitt County state court judge. He received a Distinguished Service Award from the State Bar of Georgia for 50 years of service. Judge Short was a trustee of the ABAC Foundation, a board member of Magnolia Manor, a director of the Ellen Payne Odom Genealogy Library, a Mason and a founding member of the Colquitt County Food and Clothing Bank. He served on the board of directors of Southwest Georgia Bank and was a lifetime member of and served on the board of trustees for Doerun United Methodist Church. Short was preceded in death by his wife, Charlie Roberts Short, and a daughter, Sally Short Mabbett. He is survived by his children, Herbert Jack Short Jr. and Julianne Short Richwine, and seven grandchildren.

Jack Torbett (BBA ’48) of Brunswick died Sept. 11. After attending North Georgia College, Torbett joined the U.S. Naval Air Corp and served in the U.S. Navy during World War II in the Pacific and Philippine areas, and again during the Korean War. He then attended Emory University before graduating from the University of Georgia. He was a member of Phi Delta Theta. Torbett was an active member of Christ Church, an honorary member of the Brunswick Rotary Club and a Paul Harris Fellow. He was general manager of Concrete Products Inc. and was president of The Structural Wood Fiber Products Association. He later worked as a self-employed manufacturer’s representative in the construction industry. He was a member of the Glynn County Board of Education and director of both the First Federal Savings Bank and the Brunswick Golden Isles Chamber of Commerce. He was also a member of the Brunswick Country Club and the Navy League of Golden Isles. He was preceded in death by his son, Jack “Skipper” Torbett Jr. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Nancy Shroder Torbett, and his daughters, Nancy Torbett Swift and Lisa Lane Torbett.

Ruth Valentine Williams (AB ’48) of Madison died Aug. 16. She was a beloved wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. Born on Valentine’s Day, 1924, Williams was a homemaker, the co-founder of Magic Land Kindergarten and a case worker for the Morgan County Department of Family and Children Services. She was a member of Madison Baptist Church since 1953 and served several positions there over the years. At Magic Land Kindergarten, she taught children of Madison for 12 years. During World War II, Williams was a member of the WAVES, the Navy’s service for women. She was the first female member of Post 37 of the American Legion in Madison. She is survived by her husband of 62 years, Marshall Williams, three children, and her grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Barringtown K. Beutell (BBA ’49) of Hideaway, Texas, died Oct. 2. After graduating from Thomasville Georgia High School in 1944, Beutell served during World War II in the European Theater. He graduated from the University of Georgia and then went on to serve in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Edith Wilkes Beutell, and his daughter, Johanne Woodruff.

Jack B. Deal (BSEd ’49, MEd ’55) of Savannah died Aug. 10. A beloved father, grandfather, teacher, friend and sportsman, Deal was a native of Caters in North Georgia, a place he held in his heart always. He was a veteran of World War II and served in the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Navy Armed Guard. He later married Elizabeth Martineau and they began their life together in Hazlehurst. They moved to Savannah in 1956. Deal taught for 30 years in the Diversified Co-Operative Training program, a vocational training program that helps teenagers stay in school while developing real world skills and contributing financially to their families. He graduated from the University of Georgia in 1949 with his bachelor’s degree in education and later received his master’s degree. Deal began teaching in Jefferson Davis County and continued teaching in Savannah, retiring from Savannah High School in 1980. He originated the first DCT program in both counties and was one of six original DCT coordinators in the state. Deal was a member of the Kappa Sigma, Iota Lambda Sigma and Kappa Delta Phi fraternities as well as the Demosthenian Literary Society while at UGA. A hunter and fisherman since he was four, Deal was a skilled and lifelong sportsman who strongly believed in conservation and collected first editions and signed copies of books about the sports he loved. He was also an avid gardener and treasured his rose garden. He was a member of Solomon’s Lodge #1, F&AM, American Legion Post 135, Forest City Gun Club, Scottish Rite Bodies and Alee Temple of the Shrine. He was a Master Mason and honorary aide de camp to the governor’s office.

Thurmon Hatcher (BSA ’49) of Mableton died Oct. 23. Hatcher served in the U.S. Army Medical Corporation during World War II. He graduated from the University of Georgia and later earned degrees in education at both Peabody College and Georgia State University. He began his career teaching vocational agriculture at Powder Springs High School and retired from McEachern High School in 1982. Hatcher was an active member of Bethany United Methodist Church and of the Cobb County Retired Educators Association. He is survived by his wife of 62 years, Eloise Gibson Hatcher, and his two children, Dan Hatcher and Faye Fron.

James Holliday (BS ’49) of Los Ojos, N.M., died May 9. Holliday, or “Doc,” as he was known, graduated from Athens High School and the University of Georgia before serving in the U.S. Army during World War II. He sustained an injury during the Battle of the Bulge and returned to enter Emory Dental School. He graduated in 1953 and practiced dentistry for a number of years in Athens. He then joined the Peace Corps and served for 10 years in Western Somoa, after which he joined VISTA and built and opened a clinic in Tierra Amarillo, N.M., which eventually grew into a full service medical facility. Holliday is survived by his brother, sister and many nieces and nephews.

Charles S. Jones (BBS ’49) of Albany died June 13, 2008. Jones was a retired auditor with FDIC and a member of Porterfield United Methodist Church. He is survived by many loved ones.

William Lane (BSPh ’49) of Vinton, Va., died Feb. 6.

Dr. Harry Martin (AB ’49, MA ’50) of San Antonio, Texas, died Sept. 21, 2007. He was born in Phenix City, Ala., on Oct. 22, 1916. After the 1929 market crash, Martin left school to help support his family and worked as a sharecropper, plowing fields behind a mule. When he was 16, he began work at a grocery store, followed by a sales position at a jewelry company. During this time, he developed a strong urge to overcome his lack of education and studied English and typing at the Opportunity School in Columbus. He later served in the Chemical Corps of the U.S. Army from 1942 to 1946 and was honorably discharged with the rank of captain. The G.I. Bill allowed Martin to continue his education, and he received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Georgia. He married Margaret Horne, “Peggy Pat,” in 1951 and taught sociology at Salem College until 1952. Martin later received his doctoral degree in sociology/psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He continued to do research work there until 1959 when he and his family moved to Texas, where he joined the department of psychiatry faculty at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. He continued his career as professor and chief at the school’s location in San Antonio. In 1984, Martin retired and spent more time with his wife during her struggle with cancer. They were both active members of Northwood Presbyterian Church. Martin enjoyed traveling, family camping, fishing and working on his backyard garden. He played tennis into his 80s and continued his lifelong passion for reading and studying.

William McDaniel (BSA ’49) of Jackson, S.C., died May 10, 2007. He was a native of Louisville, Ga., but lived in Jackson for the past 54 years. McDaniel was a member of the First Baptist Church of Jackson, Barracca II Sunday school class and Hopewell Masonic Lodge #127AFM. McDaniel also served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and was retired from the E.I. DuPont Company at the Savannah River site. He is survived by his wife, Edna, and their two children.

Charles Eugene Parker (BBA ’49) of Covington died on Aug. 17. He attended Georgia Military College and served in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific during World War II. After graduating from the University of Georgia, Parker reenlisted in the Marines to serve in Korea, where he earned the rank of captain. His passions included his family, friends, home, many beloved dogs, the Georgia Bulldogs, the Marine Corps and jazz music. He was known for his quick wit and sense of humor. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Ann Parker, and his three children.

Col. Alva Pendergrass Jr. (BBA ’49) of Martin, Tenn., died Aug. 7. He was born May 10, 1927, in Elberton. He was married to Betty Dawkins, who preceded him in death, and later to Carmen Tilghman. He was a U.S. Army veteran and obtained the rank of colonel before retiring after 30 years of service. He graduated from the University of Georgia in 1949 and later received his master’s degree from Boston University. Pendergrass was a professor of military science at the University of Tennessee at Martin and a member of Martin First United Methodist Church. He was also active in Gideons International, Martin Rotary Club, Martin City Beautiful, Martin Tree Board, University Post 69 of the American legion and Tennessee Urban Forestry Association. Pendergrass was a 32nd degree Mason and a 50-year member of Martin City Lodge 551. He is survived by his wife Carmen, six sons, his daughter, 23 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren.

Thomas Powell (M’ 49) of Cumming died July 25. Powell served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II. He retired from the Fulton County Sheriff’s Department and was of the Baptist faith. He is survived by his wife, Marie Andrews Powell, his children, Rebecca P. Dunn, Rita P. Glosson and Thomas O. Powell Jr., and four grandchildren.

Samuel James Von Hollen (BBA ’49) of Clinton died Oct. 23. After graduating from Presbyterian College, the University of Georgia and the Louisiana State University School of Banking, Von Hollen joined M.S. Bailey and Son Bankers and retired as president in 1988. He served as an elder and treasurer of First Presbyterian Church, as president of the Clinton Kiwanis Club, president of the Clinton Chamber of Commerce, president of the United Way, chairman of the board of trustees of Laurens County School District 56, treasurer of the Clinton YMCA, director of the Clinton Newberry Natural Gas Authority, president of the South Carolina Student Loan Association, president of the Clinton Cotillion Club, trustee of the Laurens County Library and director of the South Carolina Bankers Association. Von Hollen was named Clinton’s Young Man of the Year in 1960 and Clinton’s Citizen of the Year by the Clinton Lion’s Club in 1972. He is survived by his children, Dirke Von Hollen, Stephen Von Hollen and Nancy V. Richards.

Milton Westbrook (BBA ’49) of Cumming died Sept. 14. After graduating from Crisp County High School, Westbrook joined the U.S. Navy in 1941 and served during World War II in the South Pacific for over three years. He was a member of Delta Sigma Pi and eventually served as president. Westbrook was a Mason and a member of the Shrine Temple Atlanta. As an independent insurance agent and real estate broker, he owned his own agency in the North Dekalb area for over 20 years. He and his wife Sarah enjoyed some 20 years of retirement together and spent much of their time at their cabin at Lake Lanier with their grandsons. He is survived by his son, Bob Westbrook, and many loved ones.

Martha Woolfolk (BSEd ’49) of Columbus, Ga., died Aug. 19. Woolfolk was born in Columbus on Aug. 10, 1928, and attended Columbus High School. Later, she attended Hollins College in Roanoke, Va., and graduated from UGA as a member of Phi Mu sorority. She married William Carter Woolfolk in 1950, and they were married for 25 years until his death in March 1975. Woolfolk was a member of First Presbyterian Church and the Columbus Town Committee of the National Society of Colonial Dames of America. She also served as president of the Junior League of Columbus as well as chairman of several special events for the Historic Columbus Foundation.

1950–1954

Elizabeth Moss Bailey (MEd ’50) of Cherokee died Sept. 8. Before attending the University of Georgia, she graduated from Reinhardt College in 1928, where she was elected “Miss Reinhardt.” She then graduated from LaGrange College in 1930 before going on to receive her master’s in education at UGA in 1950. She began her teaching career in Horry County, S.C., at Floyds High School. She went on to serve as principal at Waleska Elementary School and as the first curriculum director for Cherokee County schools. She was also curriculum director for the Georgia Department of Education. Bailey later returned to Reinhardt College and was dean of women and taught English. It was there that she received the John Wesley Award during the 2000-2001 school year and a scholarship was established in her honor. In addition, Bailey is on the Wall of Outstanding Alumni at LaGrange College. She was a member of Waleska United Methodist Church until she moved to Pawleys Island in 1997 and became an associate member of St. Paul’s Waccamaw United Methodist Church. Bailey was a member of Delta Kappa Gamma. She enjoyed making and restoring quilts and reading. She is survived by her daughter, Betty Moss Bailey McGuirt, and many loved ones.

James Bower (BSA ’50) of Milledgeville died March 15. Bower enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1941 and was commissioned an infantry 2nd lieutenant. the following year. In 1943, he received his glider wings and was commissioned 1st lieutenant. After serving in England and France, flying resupply missions into Germany as a C-47 co-pilot, he separated from the Army Air Corps. Bower married Maureen Ellis in June of 1944, and they returned home. He received his bachelor’s degree in agriculture in 1950 and was appointed a rural mail carrier in Bacon County, serving the U.S. Postal Service for 14 years. During that time, Bower became a tree farmer and raised beef cattle. He received a private pilot’s license in 1959 and his commercial license in 1962. Bower became an accomplished pilot who enjoyed aerobatics and pinpoint landings. He was a member of First Baptist Church of Alma, where he was elected deacon, a first commander of the VFW post in Alma and a member of the Bacon County Masonic Lodge for 50 years. In 1965, he opened Bower’s Medical Equipment in Alma and added a second business location in August the following year. He and his wife retired in Milledgeville in 1986. Bower is survived by his wife of 63 years, Maureen, and their children.

Glenn Boyd Braselton Jr. (BBA ’50) of Athens died March 17. He was a native of Jackson County but had lived in Athens for the past 41 years. Braselton graduated from Gainesville High School prior to graduating from the University of Georgia with his bachelor’s degree in business. He also completed two years at the UGA School of Law and was then conferred a juris doctor degree from the Birmingham School of Law. Braselton was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He was a member of Milledge Avenue Baptist Church. He is survived by his three sons and a grandson.

Stewart E. Brown (ABJ ’50) of Santa Maria, Calif., died on Aug. 10. He is survived by his wife of 38 years, Sharon Brown, and many loved ones. While at the University of Georgia, Brown was a member of Tau Epsilon Phi and was very active in the drama department. His love of theater remained with him throughout his life. He led a successful career in marketing and advertising and was vice president director of marketing and advertising at Max Factor in Hollywood for over 25 years. He went on to work for EJ&L Advertising Agency and then to Leiner Health Products before retiring to Santa Monica, Calif.

Grady Newton Coker Jr. (M ’50) of Concordia, Kan., died April 18. Grady graduated from Emory University and did his postgraduate studies at the University of Georgia before earning his doctorate degree in medicine from the Medical College of Georgia in 1954. Grady was a third generation medical doctor whose family practiced medicine for over 100 years. Coker’s grandfather, N.J. Coker, opened the first modern hospital in North Georgia. Coker practiced briefly with his father in Canton and then practiced obstetrics and gynecology in Kansas for over 30 years. He delivered 6,000 babies before retiring to Colorado Springs in 1990. He was a Life Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and a member of both the American Medical Association and the American Medical Association Political Action Committee. Coker fought in World War II in the U.S. Marine Corps with the First Armored Amphibian Battalion. He was the editor of the Armored Amphibian Battalion’s Web site: http://www.marineamphibians.com. He was a life member of the Sixth Marine Division Associate and a member of the Fourth Marine Division. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Sarah Beall Coker, and his children, Sharon Coker Stinson, Grady Newton Coker III, Lawrence William Coker and Stephen Hallum Coker.

John Sidney Conner (BSA ’50, MS ’59) of Statham died Oct. 10. During World War II, Conner served on the USS Yorktown as a pharmacist mate and pharmacist technician during the Yokohama and Hiroshima campaigns. He worked for the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension service and retired from the National Dairy Council. He was distinguished as the first male volunteer with St. Mary’s Auxiliary and volunteered with St. Mary’s Hospice House. Conner was a member of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church. He is survived by his wife, Marie Townsend Conner, and his daughter, Madelyn Krieger.

Stewart Daniel (M ’50) of Brunswick died Nov. 22, 2007. He had a lifelong passion for baseball. After graduating from Glynn Academy, Daniel joined the U.S. Air Force and became a member of the Vance Air Force Base Cherokees baseball team. From there, he was recruited by the Philadelphia Phillies Farm System. After his discharge from the Air Force, he moved back to Brunswick to live and start a family. After having children and settling down, he gave back to his community by coaching little league baseball and softball. He worked Ocean Motors until 1960 and then at Coastal Chevrolet until the early 1970s. After retiring from the car business, Daniel opened Evergreen Memorial Cemetery on the north end of his farm, the Diamond Bar D Ranch. Other business endeavors over the years included owning Popingo Video and dabbling in raising ostriches. Daniel was involved with the Elks, Kiwanis, Masons and Shriners. He was one of the early members of the Brunswick Country Club, the Wednesday Night Supper Club, the Red House Gang and the Raccoon Club. He is survived by his wife, Frances J. Daniel; his sons, Scott, Reese and Gregg Daniel; and his daughter, Daryl Moore.

William Evans (BBA ’50) of McDonough died Oct. 3. Evans was a member of St. Joseph’s Episcopal Church. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, Marjie Evans; his children, David, Patrick, Paul Evans, and Teresa Evans Burns; and 10 grandchildren.

William Flake Sr. (BBA ’50) of Young Harris died Sept. 8. Before earning his master’s degree in world economics at the University of Georgia, he graduated from Georgia Military College in 1947. Flake served in the U.S. Air Force and went on to be an executive of Ford Motor Company. He was a member of the First United Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife, Sara Lane Flake, and his sons, William and Thomas Flake.

Thomas Watson McDonald Jr. (BBA ’50) of Monroe died Oct. 14. McDonald earned a degree from Emory at Oxford in 1948 before graduating from the University of Georgia in 1950. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He was an avid fisherman and was known for his love of the outdoors. He was an Eagle Scout and scouting leader for 14 years. He was a member of the Monroe Rotary Club and founding trustee of George Walton Academy in Monroe. He owned and operated Cherokee Rose Candy Company, a family business, for 39 years. During that time, he served as a board member of the National Candy Wholesalers Association for 13 years. After retirement, McDonald mentored in the Monroe Elementary School’s reading and literacy program. He attended the First Baptist Church of Rome. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Jean McDowell McDonald; his three children, Dr. Thomas R. McDonald, Pamela McDonald Blanford and Jennifer McDonald Kilcrease; and five grandchildren.

George Robert Phillips (BS ’50, MEd ’65) of Madison died Oct. 2. Phillips served in the U.S. Navy on Okinawa during World War II. After graduating from the University of Georgia, he taught chemistry and general science at Roosevelt High School in Atlanta. He retired as head of the science department. In 1957, Phillips received a grant in botany and biology and continued his education at the University of California Berkley. He also worked at Fulton Bag Cotton Mill with YMCA boys. He was a dedicated botanist and enjoyed furnishing local businesses and gardens with subtropical and exotic plants. He was a member of the Madison Presbyterian Church, the Southeastern Exotic Plants and Palm Society, the Georgia Cattleman’s Association and the Greene and Morgan Timber and Landowners Association. Phillips was a rancher, nurseryman and a member of the Georgia Republican Party. He is survived by his wife, Julia Thorn Phillips, and his sons, George Robert Phillips Jr. and Parker Kim Phillips.

Johnny Rauch (BSEd ’50) of Oldsmar, Fla., died June 10, 2008. A starting quarterback for four seasons with the Georgia Bulldogs, Rauch left UGA for the NFL after his 1948 season. He was the first player in NCAA history to start four consecutive bowl games and set the then career passing record. During his quarterback tenure, the Bulldogs won two SEC titles, and enjoyed an undefeated season and a national championship in 1946. Rauch spent four years in the NFL before beginning a lengthy coaching career. He became head coach of the Raiders in 1966, leading them to 33 wins in only three seasons and a chance at national champs in Super Bowl II. John Madden and Bill Walsh were two of his later famous assistants. O.J. Simpson’s rookie year coach, Rauch was voted AFC Coach of the Year in 1967. He retired from coaching in 1985 and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2004. He was also chosen for the Georgia-Florida Hall of Fame in 2000 and Georgia’s Circle of Honor in 2001.

DeLamar Turner Jr. (BBA ’50) of Savannah died Oct. 25. Turner was a 1945 graduate of Savannah High School and a Silver Palm Eagle Scout. Turner served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He graduated in 1950 from the University of Georgia, where he was a member of the Alpha Kappa Psi business fraternity. He worked for 30 years for Burroughs Corporation. After his retirement, he and his wife owned and operated the Dallas Bluff Marina on the Julientoon River in McIntosh County. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Catherine Lankenau Turner; his children, DeLamar Turner III, Margie Moore, Nancy Brown, Robbie Turner, Barry Turner and Cathy Wells; and 14 grandchildren.

Chester W. Williams (MEd ’50) of Statesboro died Oct. 7. Williams received a bachelor’s degree in education from Georgia Southern College on an athletic scholarship, where he lettered in varsity basketball, football, track and boxing. He later earned his master’s degree in education from the University of Georgia. He was principal of Metter High School for 10 years before serving as principal of North Habersham High School and Reidsville High School. Throughout his tenure in the public schools of Georgia, he also served as athletic director, varsity coach and classroom teacher. Williams attended the Naval Officers’ School in Hollywood, Fla., and was recognition and gunnery officer on the U.S. General W.G. Haan. He completed four years of Citizens’ Military Training in Charleston, S.C., and was lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve. He was a member of the Statesboro National Guard from 1931-1933. Williams was an active member of the First Baptist Church, where he was a Sunday school teacher and department superintendant and deacon. He was president of the Lions Club and the Kiwanis Club. He previously served as chairman of the Heart Fund Drive, the March of Dimes Committee, Polio County Committee, Parent-Teachers Association and the Band Boosters. He was also a member of the Silver Haired Legislature and served as speaker of the house for the group. He was a magistrate judge of the Small Claims Court for four years and was active in many other community services over the years. He was preceded in death by his wife, Mary Akins Williams. He is survived by his son, Roger Bron Williams.

Dewey Franklin DeLettre Jr. (BBA ’51) of Savannah died Nov. 1. A lifelong resident of Savannah, DeLettre was a graduate of Armstrong Junior College and the University of Georgia. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He retired in 1992 after 35 years of service to American Cyanamid and Kemira. He was a member of Landrum Lodge #48, F&AM and Calvary Baptist Temple. DeLettre was preceded in death by his wife of 54 years, Natalie Hymes DeLettre. He is survived by his daughter, Debbie Ray, and his sons, Dewey, Daniel and David DeLettre.

Hillyer C. King Jr. (BBA ’51) of Atlanta died Jan. 11. King attended Athens High School and graduated from the University of Georgia in 1951 with his bachelor’s degree in business, where he was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity. King served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War and retired from the U.S. Reserves as a major in 1971. For most of his career, he worked at American Charts Printing Co., but he later purchased Lithonia Litho, which he sold when he retired. King was a member of Peachtree Presbyterian Church for 28 years but most recently attended Northbrook United Methodist. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Ann, and their three children.

Morris L. Miller Jr. (BSF ’51, MF ’52) of Brooklet died July 22, 2007. He graduated from Stilson High School before attending the University of Georgia, where he received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in forest resources. Miller served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was a lifelong farmer and registered forester for more than 50 years and served the Georgia Commodities Commission for Peanuts for 12 years. Miller also served on the Bulloch County Farm Bureau as president, a position he held for the past 34 years. He was a member of the Ivanhoe Hunting Club, National Rifle Association, Hubert United Methodist Church and United Methodist Men. He is survived by his wife of 24 years, Ginger, and their children.

James Moore (AB ’51, MA ’53) of Douglasville died June 9, 2008. In 1955, Moore became an associate professor of foreign languages at West Georgia College and retired more than 30 years later as associate professor emeritus of foreign languages. He received the Outstanding Retired Professors Award and the Thelma Harman Turner Loyalty Award. After his retirement, Moore was active in community affairs including serving as president of the Douglas County Chapter of AARP, Douglas County retired educators, Douglas County Historical Society and Douglasville Cultural Arts Curators. He was an avid opera and classical music fan who enjoyed traveling, reading and gardening. He is survived by many loved ones.

Waller Nicholson Jr. (MSA ’51) of Doraville died June 13, 2008. Dr. Nick, as he was affectionately known, was a lifelong educator. He taught at the University of Wyoming and at Abraham Baldwin Agriculture College where he was head of the math and science division. Nicholson also enjoyed working with the Boy Scouts and little league baseball. At his church in Tifton, Nicholson was very active, serving as a deacon and teaching Sunday School. He is survived by many loved ones.

James Quintrell (BSA ’51) of Conyers died Aug. 6. He was born May 26, 1921, in Fannin County. Quintrell proudly served our country in the Army Air Corp during World War II in the Pacific Theater. While stationed in Guam, his group retrofitted B-29 super-fortresses for high altitude, long-range missions. His team also worked on the Enola Gay before it dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. After the war, Quintrell graduated from Young Harris College in 1949 and the University of Georgia in 1951. He worked at Sealtest Dairies with dairy farmers in middle Georgia for his entire professional career. His friends and family appreciated his fine fried chicken, witty sense of humor and genial personality. He was preceded in death by his wife, Marie, and is survived by his two children, five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Beverly Webb (BSEd ’51) of Marietta died Oct. 14. Webb was a longtime member of Johnson Ferry Baptist Church where she taught a class, “Two Becoming One,” with her husband. She was a member of the choir and spent all of her time giving to other people. She taught for 28 years and spent the last 16 at The Lovett School. Webb is survived by her husband, Lee H. Webb; two sons, William West Webb and Lee Hampton Webb IV; and four grandchildren.

Wesley Bass Jr. (BBA ’52) of Winnetka, Ill., died May 12, 2008. A U.S. Army Aviation Forces veteran, he served as a pilot in Korea and was discharged as captain. While in graduate school, he was a flight instructor at Palwaukee Airport. Bass held several positions at the Chicago Title and Trust Co., including treasurer, comptroller and executive vice president. From 1967 to 1986, he headed the Trust Division. He began the Retirement Planning Fund of America and served for many years on the board of directors of Venture Advisors and the Davis Funds. Bass served many terms as president of the Illinois Society for the Prevention of Blindness, where he worked to put the organization on solid financial grounds, to establish legislation to ensure low vision testing for all children, to provide funding for eye glasses and low vision aids for children in need, and to create an eye tissue donation bank. He was a treasurer of the Northwestern University Alumni Association and a member of Christ Church, Winnetka, and later of the Church of the Redeemer. He was the first president of the original board of directors of the Institute for Christian Living and served later terms on the board after it became the Institute for Living. Bass enjoyed music, nature, traveling with his wife and family, woodwork and crafts. He is survived by his wife, two daughters, four granddaughters, three sisters, and many other loved ones.

Horace Lavon Davis (BSA ’52) of Dawson died Aug. 14. Davis served in the U.S. Army during World War II before accepting a job with the Agriculture Stabilization Conservation Service in Hazelhurst as a field agent. He later retired and began farming. He was a member of Free Will Baptist Church in the Lester Community in Mitchell County. He is survived by his wife of 35 years, Wilma Quinn Davis, and his son, Steven Davis.

Richard S. Durham (BSEd ’52) of Elizabethtown, Pa., died Sept. 18. After graduating from the University of Georgia, he served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He later taught fourth and fifth grade for 35 years at Episcopal Academy in Wynnewood, Pa., where he also coached swimming and baseball. During the summers, he directed the swimming program at Camp Magar in Bryn Mawr. He retired in 1993. Durham was a volunteer at Bryn Mawr Hospital and was an active Mason. He was a lay reader and chalice bearer at St. George’s Episcopal Church in Ardmore. In a memoir Durham wrote five years ago, he said, “I have loved the woods, fields, streams, lakes and mountains, all the animals small and large and the playing field of Episcopal, enjoying the many wins and few losses. Good friends and pleasant conversations—being with people has been the source of my joy in life.”

Mary Lois Davis Gibb (MEd ’52) of Lexington, S.C., died Sept. 27. After graduating from Rabun County High School, Gibb attended Georgia State College for Women. She began teaching elementary school at age 19. She later earned her master’s in education from the University of Georgia. Her teaching career spanned over 42 years. During her retirement, Gibb volunteered in hospitals in Key West before moving to Lexington, S.C., to be near her daughter’s family. She was a member of Lexington United Methodist Church. She was predeceased in death by her husband, William Lightbourne Gibb. She is survived by her daughter, Elizabeth Anne Gibb Bray, and many loved ones.

Frances Pickens Gotesky (AB ’52, MS ’56, EdD ’67) of Cleveland, Ga., died Oct. 8. She was a psychologist and a member of the Methodist faith. She served in the U.S. Army during World War II. She is survived by her two sons, James K. Gotesky and Stephen F. Gotesky.

Joseph Oetgen (M ’52) of Savannah died June 16, 2008. A U.S. Navy veteran, he served as an aviation machinist mate 3rd class during WWII. He began his career with Wachtels Physicians Supply Company before joining Marks Surgical Supply Company in 1958. After 20 years with them, he became an employee of Owens & Minor Inc. He retired after 40 years in the surgical supply field. A charter member of St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in Thunderbolt, he participated in several areas of the church service, including councilman and choir member. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, sons, grandchildren and many other loved ones.

Benjamin R. Page Jr. (DVM ’52) of Young Harris died Oct. 26. Page was a member of McConnell Memorial Baptist Church. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II in the Philippines. Formerly of Savannah, he was involved with local organizations such as the Alee Temple Shriners, the AMBUCS for 35 years, the Masons, the Elks Lodge and the Georgia Veterinarian Medical Association, for which he previously served as president. He was the former owner of Page Animal Hospital in Savannah, where he met the health needs of UGA mascots I, II, III and IV. He is survived by his wife, Patricia Sorrells Page, and his children, Nan Bennette Page, Shirley Putnam and Randolph Page.

William G. Richards (BSA ’52) of Atlanta died June 11. Richards was a U.S. veteran. He is survived by his wife, Helen Richards.

Dorothy Wood (ABJ ’52) of Atlanta died June 9, 2008. Reflective of her strong will and determination, Dorothy traveled to family gatherings up to one week before her death. Named Woman of the Year by her graduating class, Wood was the woman’s editor of The Red & Black while at the university. After graduation, Wood was a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, but was quickly bored due to the lack of opportunity in a then male-dominated field. She moved to Germany, before returning to the U.S. in 1959. She accepted a position as a copywriter for Rich’s in-house ad agency before becoming vice president of the Rafshoon advertising agency and directing the governor’s ad campaign for state senator Jimmy Carter. In 1972 she opened her own agency, Gordon and Wood. For twenty years, she remained a major player in Southern politics, holding accounts for a long list of recognizable names and even the Democratic Party of Georgia. She accumulated many awards for excellence in her profession. A longtime member of ALTA, she had a lifelong love of tennis. She ran and biked into her 70s, but always had a passion for photography and travel, visiting every continent except Antarctica. She is survived by a son, grandchildren and many loved ones.

Sara B. Blackwood (BSEd ’53) of Dewy Rose died Aug. 29. She was born on Sept. 23, 1916, in Elbert County. Blackwood was a lifelong member of Dewy Rose Baptist Church. She graduated from the University of Georgia with a degree in education and taught elementary school for 42 years. After she retired she was actively involved in the Georgia Retired Teachers Association. Blackwood is survived by her son, Wayne, her granddaughter, great-grandson, and many nieces and nephews.

Richard Eugene Bradley (MS ’53, DVM ’54, PhD ’65) of Morganton, N.C., died Oct. 6. Bradley attended the University of Illinois in his home state before joining the U.S. Navy and serving in the Hospital Corps during World War II. He later attended Florida State University as a student in the first co-educational class. He went on to earn his doctor of veterinary medicine degree at the University of Georgia. After graduating, he spent 10 years at a private veterinary practice in Illinois before returning to the University of Georgia to earn a degree in parasitology. Afterwards, he joined the veterinary faculty at the University of Florida in 1965, where he taught and did research in veterinary medicine until his retirement in 1990. While at the University of Florida, Bradley served in many positions with the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Florida Veterinary Medical Association and the Eastern States Veterinary Association, as well as chairing many committees with the College of Veterinary Medicine. Since 2003, he and his family have owned and operated Kustom Kare Kennel in Morganton. He was preceded in death by a son, Dick Bradley. He is survived by his wife, Alla Parnell Bradley; his children, Meghann Parnell Bradley, David Bradley, Donald Bradley and Doug Bradley; and six grandchildren.

Julian Carter Sr. (BBA ’53) of Savannah died Aug. 4. Carter was born in Augusta, raised in Anderson, S.C., and lived in Savannah for the past 50 years. He was a member of the Sons of the Revolution in Georgia and served in World War II in the 65th Troop Carrier Squadron, 5th U.S. Army Air Force. He was a former comptroller and executive assistant to the U.S. Army Corps of engineers district engineer, Savannah, with top secret clearance, and his portrait has been hung in the gallery of distinguished civilian employees at the Savannah office. He was a past president of the Savannah chapter of the Society of American Military Engineers and a designee on the board of U.S. Civil Service Examiners for the Savannah district. Carter was also a member of Wesley Monumental United Methodist Church and served on its administrative board and finance committee; he shared the treasurer responsibilities with his wife, Georgia, for 17 years. He was also treasurer and finance chairman of the Candler Hospital Auxiliary, a volunteer tax consultant to the elderly for the American Association of Retired Persons and a volunteer income tax assistant for the IRS. Carter taught advanced accounting at night at Armstrong Junior College.

Sheridan Scott Church (ABJ ’53) died Nov. 14, 2007. He was a retired PAO with The Defense General Supply Center after many years of service. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Elizabeth Church, and his daughter, Carolyn C. Davis.

William H. Fletcher (DVM ’53) of Nicholson died June 13, 2008. Fletcher served as a bomber pilot in the U.S. Air Force and was a POW for 15 months during World War II. After graduation, he practiced veterinary medicine for more than 50 years. He is survived by many loved ones.

Jane Morrison (BSEd ’53) of Atlanta died Jan. 17, after an eight-year battle with colon cancer. While enduring rounds of chemotherapy and several surgeries, she remained her elegant self throughout it all. Her family and friends admired her strong will and determination. Morrison graduated with her bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Georgia in 1953 and went on to receive her master’s in education from Georgia State University in 1978. She also received her master’s in business administration from Brenau College in 1990. While at UGA, she was a member of the Alpha Rho chapter of Delta Delta Delta sorority. Morrison taught in the DeKalb County School System and retired from Crawford Long Hospital of Emory University in 1998 after working there for more than 20 years. She was a member of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Decatur, the United Daughters of the Confederacy and an active volunteer with the Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary. Morrison also sang with the Michael O’Neal Singers for many years and played both the piano and organ to supplement the music programs at several churches.

Francis Aloysius Thompson (BBA ’53) of Charlotte, N.C., died May 17. Thompson attended Mount St. Joseph School and Boys Catholic High School in Augusta before graduating from the University of Georgia School of Business. He then received a commission as lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force through the ROTC program at UGA. He achieved the rank of major in the USAF and was assigned to the Air Force Special Weapons Command in Albuquerque, N.M., where he met and married his wife, Suzanna Coleman. He served as a trans-Atlantic pilot at Charleston AFB and as base operations officer at Thule Air Base in Greenland. While in Thule, Thompson was involved in the recovery and cleanup of the B-52 that crashed with the H-bombs on board. He served for eight years at AFTAC in Washington, D.C. He also attended the Graduate School of Business at George Washington University. He was preceded in death by an infant son, Frank Jr. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Sue Thompson, his sons, Coleman Thompson, Chris Thompson, and Frank Thompson II, his daughters, Margaret Bannerman, Ann Louise Armstrong, and Sarah Harrington, and many grandchildren and loved ones.

Julian Lamar Veatch (DVM ’53) of Louisville, Ga., died Aug. 24. Veatch was born in Atlanta on June 30, 1923. He served in the Philippines during World War II in the U.S. Army. Veatch graduated from Emory University in 1952 with a bachelor’s degree of science and went on to receive his doctoral degree in veterinary medicine from the University of Georgia in 1953. He moved to Louisville, Ga., in 1955 to open his own veterinary practice, where he worked until his retirement in 1986. Dr. Veatch served as a member of the Jefferson County Library Board for 20 years, as the Jefferson County coroner for 34 years and as the mayor of Louisville for 28 years. He also served on the CSRA planning board and the Georgia State Board of Veterinary Medicine. Veatch was a member of the Louisville United Methodist Church, the Louisville Lions Club, the Georgia Veterinary Medical Association, the Stonewall Lodge 98 F&AM and a Mason. He was preceded in death by his wife, Elinor Rees Veatch.

Allen Candler Pritchett Jr. (BBA ’54) of Perry died Oct. 15. Pritchett graduated from the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia, where he was a Phi Delta Theta, and also from the Woodrow Wilson School of Law in Atlanta. He spent two years in the Army Financial Corps in Germany. He also had a real estate license. He was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Perry and the Avon Buice Sunday school class. He is survived by his wife of 51 years, Anna Sells Pritchett; three children, Janna McBride, Candler Pritchett and Levin Pritchett; and four grandchildren.

Mary Ann Sheppard (M ’54) of Atlanta died March 16. She graduated from Washington Seminary and later attended the University of Georgia, where she was a member of Phi Mu sorority. A true lady to all who knew her, Sheppard was an avid bridge player and loved to entertain and cook for her friends and family. She embraced life and had a positive outlook, courage and determination, and inspired those who knew her. She is survived by her husband of 54 years, William, and her two sons.

James Luther Suttles Jr. (BBA ’54) of Decatur died Oct. 19. Suttles was a retired financial officer for Phillips Petroleum Co., where he worked for over 28 years. He retired a captain with the Georgia National Guard, where he served for 24 years. He was a longtime member of First Christian Church of Decatur. He is survived by his wife, Millie Suttles, and his children, Nancy and Jimmy Suttles.

1955–1959

David L. Brown Jr. (DVM ’55) of Lake City, S.C., died on Sept. 6. Before coming to the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine, Brown graduated from Clemson University. He first practiced in Florence County with Dr. George Gibson. He then served in the U.S. Air Force Veterinary Corps in Thule, Greenland, and at Shaw Air Force Base. In 1959, he opened his own practice, Brown Animal Hospital, in Lake City, where he worked passionately for 48 years. Brown was a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Lake Rotary Club for 49 years, Lake City United Methodist Church and was treasurer of the local Woodsmen of the World chapter. He was also a football coach at the Carolina Academy. He is survived by his wife, Kay McDuffie Brown, and his two daughters, Dr. Karole B. Parker and Mary B. Walker.

Edward A. Day Jr. (BBA ’55) of Ruckersville, Va., died Feb. 10.

William Lovett Griffin (BBA ’55) died April 22. He is survived by his wife, Charlcy Griffin.

Graham M. Watts (BSF ’55) of Marshalltown, Iowa, died Sept. 1. Watts graduated from Upper Darby High School before earning his bachelor’s degree from the University of Georgia. He served in the U.S. Army as a rifleman during World War II, where he earned several combat medals. Watts was a prisoner of war of the German government from March 6, 1945 until April 27, 1945, at Ludwigsburg, Germany, and was one of only six to survive this camp. He married Aurie Hayes in 1954 and made a home in Drexel Hill, Pa. He worked as a forester at Taylor Arboretum in Chester, Pa., until his retirement in 1982. The couple moved to Sunset, S.C., where they lived until 2005, when they moved to the Iowa Veterans Home in Marshalltown. Watts was preceded in death by his wife and is survived by his son, Forrest Watts, and many loved ones.

William D. Whitener (MEd ’55) of Ellijay died Aug. 13. Whitener graduated from Murray County High School before attending Piedmont College and graduating from the University of Georgia. He served in the U.S. Air Force during World War II. Whitener was a retired teacher and principal of East Ellijay Elementary School. He is survived by his sister, Peggy Huff, and his brother, Ted Whitener.

Dr. William Benton Williams (DVM ’55) of Statesville, N.C., died May 31. Williams was born on March 2, 1926, in Lakeland, Fla. He served in the U.S. Air Force during World War II and then returned to Big Stone Gap, where he married Elizabeth Noel. While he attended the University of Georgia, he established an antennae installation company to support his family and pay for his education. He graduated in 1955 with his degree in veterinary medicine and later joined a classmate in Miami to establish their own veterinary practice, Biscayne Animal Hospital. Following his retirement in 1969, Williams and his family moved to Statesville, N.C., and lived there for 22 years. He purchased land in Cleveland, N.C., and started his own farm, growing vegetables and raising dairy calves. He oversaw several dairy farms and then purchased his own in Granite Falls, N.C., which he ran with his son. Williams enjoyed fishing, all sports, painting, politics, nature, his family and his dear friends. He loved life, was always optimistic and was an inspiration to his family and friends.

Dr. Diedric O. Beusse Jr. (BSA ’56, DVM ’58) of Lakemont died Sept. 20. After graduating from the University of Georgia School of Veterinary Medicine in 1958, he established and operated a small animal practice, Trail Animal Clinic, in Orlando, Fla., for 23 years. He was also a contract veterinarian for Sea World of Florida for 30 years. He later became professor and director of the Marine Mammal Medicine Department at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine in Gainesville, Fla. He served there for three years before moving to Rabun County in 2004. Until early this year, he was a contract veterinarian with the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program in Kings Bay. Beusse was a member of Clayton Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife, Carole Ficken Beusse, and two children, Doby Beusse, and Laura B. McCue.

J. Parker Brown (BBA ’56) of Commerce died Oct. 2. Brown was a retired parole officer for the State of Georgia, a member of the First United Methodist Church of Commerce and a U.S. Air Force veteran. He is survived by his wife, Margie Haynie Brown, and his two sons, Alan and Douglas Brown.

Ira Gene Chastain (BSA ’56) died on Sept. 30. He was a member of Pleasant Grove Baptist Church, where he was a deacon. Chastain was a dairy farmer who loved woodworking, gardening and reading his Bible in his spare time. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Martha Chastain, two daughters, Euglenia Davis and Elise Christensen, a son, Michael Chastain, and eight grandchildren.

Robert A. Cronin (BBA ’56, LLB ’59) of Savannah died Sept. 5 at Hospice Savannah after a brief battle with gastric cancer. Cronin was a communicant of St. Frances Cabrini Catholic Church and was a U.S. Air Force veteran. He was a longtime member of the Hibernian Society and a former member of the Savannah Jaycees. Among his many hobbies were boating, reading, classical music, traveling and doing crossword puzzles. He practiced law in Georgia for 50 years. He is survived by his beloved wife of 43 years, Jackie Griffin Cronin, and many loved ones.

George W. Law (BBA ’56) of Jacksonville, Fla., died Aug. 13. He was born in Thomasville, Ga., in 1931. Law was a member of Kappa Alpha Fraternity while at the University of Georgia. He moved to Jacksonville, Fla., in the early 1950s and became vice president of Stockton, Whatley Davin Co. He was later elected president of the Mortgage Banker’s Association of Jacksonville. Law’s business career also included many years as a homebuilder and land developer. He was a member of the Rotary Club, All Saints Episcopal Church, where he served on the vestry, The Commodores League and was the executive director of the Delores Barr Weaver Golf Tournament to benefit HabiJax. He is survived by his wife, Judy, five children and six grandchildren.

Robert Neal Pierce (BSEd ’56, MMEd ’58) of Cartersville died Oct. 27, 2007.

Quentin Stewart (BBA ’56) of Dunwoody died June 19, 2008. A veteran of the U.S. Army, he worked for Ford Motor Company until his retirement. He is survived by his wife, children, and grandchildren.

John Hulan Bowen (MLA ’57) of Oakway, S.C., died Oct. 27. Born and raised in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Bowen left home to attend Clemson University and graduated in 1950. A member of the U.S. Army Reserve, he was called to active duty and served two years as an officer and participated in a tour of Korea. He later enrolled in graduate school at the University of Georgia, where he was the first student to complete a master’s degree in landscape architecture. He began his career as a landscape architect for the federal government with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in their Mobile office. He later transferred to Washington, D.C., with the General Services Administration, and then went to work for the Bureau of Public Roads, where he worked on the site planning and landscape design of several historic landmarks in D.C., including the Smithsonian Institute, Gallaudet College, Howard University and St. Elizabeth Hospital. In 1967, he became an associate professor for the landscape architecture program at Mississippi State University. He returned to government services in the Mobile office of the U.S. Army Corps again in 1969, where he stayed until his retirement in 1990. Bowen was an avid gardener and an active volunteer for the American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity and the Mobile Botanical Gardens, of which he was a founding member. He was a member of Spring Hill Presbyterian Church for over 30 years. He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Thelma McGee Bowen, and his children, John Clark Bowen and Rebecca Bowen Bogan.

Joe Jones (BBA ’57) of Atlanta died June 13, 2008. An avid UGA fan, hot-air balloonist and owner of the All-Steel Building Company, Jones was a long-time member of the Chamblee-Doraville Business Men’s Association. He was also a member of the Sons of the American Revolution and the Georgia Balloonist Association. He is survived by his wife, daughter and many loved ones.

Alfred Wayne Martin (BS ’57) of Porter, Texas, died Aug. 25. He enjoyed mountain climbing, camping, trains and meeting new people. He attended St. John of the Cross Catholic Church. He is survived by his wife, Joyce Martin, and his sons, Samuel and Ronald Martin.

Dr. Frank Scott (EdD ’57) of Blacksburg, Va., died Nov. 25, 2007. He was a member of the Blacksburg United Methodist Church. Scott also served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He received his bachelor’s degree in psychology in 1948 as well as his master’s degree from Duke University. Scott later received his doctoral degree in educational psychology from the University of Georgia in 1957. He was a professor at Radford University and dean of the School of Social Science there before retiring. He is survived by his wife, Jean, their children and grandchildren.

Guyton Otis Terry Jr. (AB ’57) of Martinez died Aug. 19. Terry was an Albany native and graduated from Albany High School in 1953. Following graduation, he attended the University of Georgia where he received his bachelor’s degree in English. While an undergraduate there, Terry was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity. After graduation, he received a commission as a 2nd lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force, in which he served for 12 years as a flying officer, navigator, and missile launch operator. Terry was a decorated serviceman, receiving several awards including the National Defense Service Medal, Master Missileman Badge, Joint Service Commodation Medal and Meritorious Service Medal. In 1969, Terry enrolled in the Juris Doctor program at the University of Wyoming, where he received his law degree in 1972. He then entered the U.S. Army as an attorney at law and became a member of the staff Judge Advocate Corps. He retired in 1981 ranked lieutenant colonel at Fort Gordon. Terry continued his professional career with the U.S. Treasury Department as an estate and gift tax attorney and lived in Martinez for the past 32 years. He is survived by his wife Gail, and two children.

Dr. Harry M. Turner (BS ’57, MEd ’68, EdD ’71) of Acworth died Sept. 28. Before coming to the University of Georgia, Turner attended Inman Park School, Grady High School and the Georgia Military Academy. He was a Ranger Scout with the Boy Scouts of America. Turner joined the U.S. Marine Corps at 17 and was in a reconnaissance unit during the Korean War. Upon his return, he played tennis for Georgia State University before attending UGA. After graduating from UGA with a degree in psychology, he worked as a rehabilitation counselor for the State of Georgia. He was selected for a special program to train school psychologists in 1968, and he returned to UGA to obtain his doctorate in psychology in 1972. He then worked as a school psychologist for DeKalb County Schools until his retirement in 1978, during which time he wrote a manual for the schools regarding suicidal teenagers. During his career, he focused on working with bright, underachieving teenagers. Turner enjoyed chess, which he taught to children at the Boys and Girls Club in Dallas, Ga. His hobbies also included canoeing and hiking, and he and his wife of 31 years, Faith Waldron Turner, traveled abroad extensively during their retirement. Turner is survived by his wife and his five children.

Julian H. Cox Jr. (BBA ’58) of Athens died June 10, 2008. Always living his life with passion, Cox loved the outdoors, his family and friends. He began his career with Hutchins, Cox & Stroud before founding Julian H. Cox Realtors, LLC. Cox served the business community for more than 50 years. A member of the Athens Board of Realtors, Cox was the recipient of the Phoenix Award, a life member of the Million Dollar Club, Chamber of Commerce, the Touchdown Club of Athens, Athens Country Club and First United Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife and many loved ones.

George Creal (AB ’58) of Atlanta, died Aug. 20. Creal was born on April 21, 1936, in Kansas City, Mo. He followed his father, a Western Union Executive, across the country but always considered Atlanta his true home. He used his Southern accent and affable charm to great effect. Creal loved music, especially jazz and the clarinet. He attended the Georgia Military Academy as well as UGA, where he was a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity. He started his own public relations firm and incorporated his passion for politics by contributing to campaigns for both parties. Creal was passionate about life and his family.

Henry Hammond (BSPH ’58) of Arnoldsville died Sept. 8. He worked at Richard Russell Research Center at the University of Georgia before retiring in 1992. He served during the Korean War in the U.S. Army and was a member of Beech Haven Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife, Montine Kiser Hammond, and his daughter, Joy Fuga.

Dr. Bill Hancock (BSED ’58) of Nashville, N.C., died on Sept. 2. After graduating from Robert E. Lee High School in Thomaston, Hancock served in the U.S. Air Force and was stationed in England for four years during the Korean War. It was there that he met his wife, Anne. He then moved back to the U.S. and studied history and education and graduated from the University of Georgia. He went on to teach and chair the social studies department at Titusville High School in Florida. He later earned his master’s and a Ph.D. from the University of Florida. He then served in academic and administrative positions in Vero Beach, Fla., Wichita, Kan., Valdosta, and Nashville, N.C. In addition, he taught as an adjunct professor at Sanford University. He was also involved in his local Democratic Party and served on the county organizing committee. He retired from RBC Centura in 1998. He was an avid reader and chess player and enjoyed teaching chess to kids. Among his other hobbies were gourmet cooking, writing and local community theater. He traveled often with his wife, visiting old friends and family in the U.S., England and Ireland. He is survived by his devoted wife of 55 years, Anne Philomena O’Donoghue Hancock, his three sons and many loved ones.

Ralph A. Harper (LLB ’58) of Houston, Texas, died Oct. 4 after battling cancer. He graduated from Colgate University, where he played semi-professional basketball, in 1951 before earning his law degree from the University of Georgia School of Law in 1954. While at the University of Georgia, he pledged Phi Gamma Delta and was a member of the Law Review and the Demosthenian Literary Society. He served three years as a captain in the U.S. Air Force and was a member of the St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church. Harper was a senior partner in the Vinson & Elkins law firm, where he worked from 1957 to 1988. In addition to serving on the executive committee for the firm, he was head of the banking section for 20 years and was chairman of the employment committee. Harper was selected to Who’s Who Among American Lawyers. He was a trusted advisor to First City National Bank of Houston for many years, and he was general counsel to the Gemini Seven Astronaut Group in the 1960s. He served on the boards of directors of First City Bank of Highland Village, Cullen Savings, Heights State Bank and Houston Trust. He was general counsel and president of American Field Trials Association, president of the Lone Star Retrievers Club, and president of the American Ostrich Association. He is survived by his wife, Sandra Paul Harper, his children, Victoria Harper and Ralph A. Harper Jr., and his twin brother and his younger brother, Ben H. Harper and Jack H. Harper.

Norris D. Hawks (BBA ’58) of Johnson City, Fla., died Oct. 17. After graduating from the University of Georgia, Hawks served two years in the U.S. Army in Germany. He then began his career as an insurance claims adjuster in Jacksonville, Fla. He was transferred to Johnson City in 1965, and he retired from State Auto Insurance Company in 1998. Hawks was a member of the Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church for over 40 years and most recently served as an usher and in the Shepherd Ministry. He loved the Georgia Bulldogs, country music and being on the golf course. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Linda Sullivan Hawks, and his daughter, Melody Hawks Mazich.

Emory Proctor (BSA ’58) of Brooklet died Sept. 9. After graduating from Stilson High School in 1950, Proctor served four years in the U.S. Air Force. He then attended Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College before graduating from the University of Georgia in 1958. He went on to earn his master’s from Georgia Southern. He was ordained to the ministry in 1961 at Lanes Primitive Baptist Church and was active in the Primitive Baptistry for 48 years. In 1969, he founded and served as pastor of Grace Primitive Baptist Church in Savannah. Proctor taught in the Savannah public school system for several years and spent 34 years working with the Georgia Department of Vocational Rehabilitation. He was named director of the deaf-blind unit at the Roosevelt-Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation in Warm Springs in 1980. He retired in 1991 and went on to serve as pastor of several churches in Georgia and Florida before settling down in Brooklet in 1999 and serving at Fellowship Primitive Baptist Church in Stilson. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Kay McCormick Proctor, and his children, Cliff Proctor and Emily Strickland.

William Kee (BSEd ’59) of Joelton, Tenn., died December 21, 2007. He received his bachelor’s degree in industrial arts education from UGA in 1959. He is survived by his wife, mother, two daughters, four step-daughters and several grandchildren.

1960–1964

Louise Booth (BSHE ’60) of Moultrie died March 18. She was born Oct. 23, 1937 in Brooks County. After receiving her degree from UGA, Booth worked for the UGA Corp. Extension Service as a 4-H agent until her retirement. She is survived by two sons, two stepdaughters and four grandchildren.

Gill K. Brown (BSF ’60, MF ’61) of Belvedere Island died Sept. 27. After earning both his bachelor’s and his master’s degrees at the University of Georgia, he joined the Georgia Power Co., where he remained for the entirety of his career. In 1994, Brown retired as the general manager of forestry and construction after many successful years of business. Gill enjoyed deer and bird hunting, as well as all types of fishing. His hobbies also included reading and do-it-yourself projects, including the family vacation home he built on Lake Sinclair. He was active in Habitat for Humanity in the McIntosh County region, overseeing the project management to build numerous homes for those in need. He also volunteered his time to the student mentoring program in McIntosh County. He was a member of the board of directors for the Property Owners Association of Belvedere Island Plantation. He is survived by his wife of 36 years, Georgia Hermanson Brown, and their four children.

Lucy Butler (BSEd ’60) of Atlanta died on Oct. 15. Butler was a retired school administrator for the City of Atlanta School System and a member of Peachtree Road Methodist Church. She was a member of an informal feminist group and was active in women’s issues. She was preceded in death by her husband of 53 years, Charles H. Butler. She is survived by her children, Charles David Butler, Florence Butler Dawson and Sara Ann Butler Wester, along with ten grandchildren, ten great-grandchildren, and many loved ones.

George H. Shepherd (BBA ’60) of Huntsville, Ala., died Aug. 26. After serving in the U.S. Navy, Shepherd attended the University of Alabama, the University of Georgia, and the Jones School of Law. He was a member of the First Baptist Church of Huntsville. He is survived by his wife, Margaret Anne Brown Shepherd, and his daughters, Margaret Susan Shepherd Verna and Marilyn Shepherd Ayers.

Gainya Williams (AB ’60) of Gainesville, Fla., died March 19, 2008. Remembered for her contagious inspiration, Williams dedicated her life to education. She taught English in Lakeland, Fla., before moving to Gainesville, Fla., where she taught at Heritage Christian School. She ended her teaching career as a GED instructor at several centers and schools. She loved the mountains, the ocean, travel, classical music, reading, and cooking. She also had a passion for horses and dogs. She is survived by her son.

Donald M. Archdeacon (BBA ’61) of Stony Brook, N.Y., died Feb. 15. Archdeacon was an active member of Umpires Association and the Stony Brook Rotary. He is survived by his beloved wife, Mary Archdeacon, and their five children.

Peggy B. Harris (BSHE ’61, MEd ’64) of Crawford died June 15, 2008. After graduation, Harris taught at Decatur City and Walton County schools. She retired early to spend time with her family, her greatest joy. After her children had left the house, she returned to teaching at the Oglethorpe County middle School, retiring in 1993. Harris was a member of Lexington Baptist Church, where she served many roles including librarian. Books were one of her many passions. She is survived by her husband of four years, their children, and many loved ones.

Dr. James Metts (M ’61) of Evans, died June 22, 2007. Metts graduated from Emory University Dental School and the University of Pennsylvania School of Orthodontics. He was a member of the Georgia Dental Association, the American Dental Association and the American Association of Orthodontists. Metts received the Beggs Award for Orthodontics in 1974. He was a member of the Lion’s Club of Evans and the Wesley United Methodist Church, where he sang in the celebration choir. He is survived by his wife, Glenda, and their five children.

Laurence Ed Smith (AB ’62) of Newnan, died on Sept. 6 at Duke University Medical Center because of complications resulting from a heart transplant. Smith was born in Toccoa on Dec. 28, 1939. He began his lifelong dedication to service as an Eagle Scout and went on to serve in the U.S. Coast Guard. He graduated from Calhoun High School, UGA and the UGA Law School. Smith was a member of the First Baptist Church of Newnan as well as a member and past president of the Golden Kiwanis Club of Newnan. Smith started his career with the Better Business Bureau in 1967. He served as president and CEO of the Atlanta Better Business Bureau from 1977 until his retirement in 2002. During his career there, Smith served in various leadership positions and was awarded the Meritorious Service Award for exceptional service in 1995. He was a member of the Bureau’s 25 Year Club and was inducted into the Better Business Bureau Hall of Fame in 2005. Smith is survived by his wife of 46 years, the former Myra Sherard, his two sons and their wives, and four grandchildren.

Sallye Garrett Bennett (MEd ’63, EdS ’71) of Adel died Oct. 20. Bennett attended Quitman High School, where she was a star basketball player and voted “All Association Side Center” her junior and senior years. She went on to attend Georgia State College for Women in Milledgeville. She later earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education at Valdosta State College and two education degrees from the University of Georgia. She began her teaching career at Morven Elementary School and was a second grade teacher at Adel Elementary School for 22 years. She was then selected to be curriculum director of Cook County Schools, a position she held until her retirement in 1975. She was voted Teacher of the Year in 1958 and was past state president of Georgia’s Division of Instructional Supervision. She was a member of Kappa Delta Pi, an honor sorority, and of Delta Kappa Gamma, an international honor sorority for women teachers. She was known as “Miss Sallye” to many, and held memberships in GEA, Cook Education Association, the National and Georgia Associations of Supervision and Curriculum Development, Classroom Teacher Association, National Council of Teachers of English and served on the accreditation committee of Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. She served on many visiting committees, evaluating elementary schools in the state for accreditation with SACS. She was a member of the State Planning Committee for Operation CD and served two years on the State Advisory Committee for Project ROME, a Title II project conducted by the University of Georgia. Bennett was also an active member of Adel First Baptist Church and a member of Fidelis Sunday school class. She was chairman of the history committee that wrote and published “The History of First Baptist Church, Adel, Georgia 1891-1991” and “The History of First Baptist Church, Adel, Georgia 1991-2001.” She was voted Woman of the Year in 1998 by the Cook County Chamber of Commerce. Bennett was an avid gardener and flower lover; she was a member and past president of Aden Garden Club and a life member of Garden Club of Georgia. In 1993, she co-founded and was first vice president of Cook County Council for the Arts. She produced and directed “Showtime,” an area talent show and fund-raising event for the Council of the Arts, for 10 years. In May 2000, she was presented a plaque of appreciation by the Cook High School Band. She was an active member of the Cook County Chamber of Commerce and the Daughters of the American Revolution. She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert Bennett Sr. She is survived by two children, Robert Bennett Jr. and Joan Nicholson, along with seven grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.

Charles Hawes “Charlie” Clary (AB ’63) of Thomson died June 13, 2008. After serving in the Georgia National Guard during the Cuban Missile Crisis, Clary began his career in life insurance with Continental Assurance Corp. He worked for many years with American Agency Life Insurance Co. with stints with his own agencies. After his retirement from life insurance, Clary returned to his hometown to pursue his love of antiquities, while consulting for the law firm of Dallas & Medlin. He is survived by his children and many loved ones.

Dana B. Cumming (AB ’63) of Griffin died Sept. 14. Cumming was a lifelong resident of Griffin and was a devoted Georgia football fan. She is survived by her husband of 46 years, W. Barron Cumming Sr., a daughter, Beth M. Cumming, a son, Barron Cumming Jr., and many loved ones.

Thomas Cates Jr. (BBA ’64) died Aug. 19. He was a native of Burke County and a veteran of the U.S. Army. Cates was a member of the First Baptist Church and the American Legion, both of Waynesboro. He had retired from his company, Cates Signs, Inc. of Orlando, Fla. Cates was preceded in death by his wife, Lillian Diane Seneriz Cates.

Dr. W. Scott Haugh (BS ’64) of Hartwell, died Jan. 16. after a battle with lung cancer. He was born on July 16, 1941, in East Liverpool, Ohio. Later, Haugh received his undergraduate degree from UGA and his doctorate of dentistry from the University of Alabama, Birmingham. Haugh practiced dentistry until his retirement in 2006 and was a member of the American Dental Association.

John C. Key (MEd ’64) of Birmingham, Ala., died June 9, 2008. A WWII veteran, he served in the U.S. Merchant marine as a Coast Guard from 1942-45 and in the U.S. Army from 1945-47. Key began his career in public education in 1952, serving for 36 years in Alabama, Georgia, and the Department of Dense Schools in Bad Kreuznach, Germany. He was a teacher, athletics coach and director, outdoor education director and athletic trainer. A volunteer for the American Red Cross in water safety, he was also a Boy Scouts of America Scoutmaster, Camp Counselor and Commissioner. Key was a member of the Northwest Georgia Council, BSA. Voted Who’s Who in America for coaching, Key loved spending his time volunteering with water safety programs. A loving husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, he will be remembered by many as a father for his dedication to teaching and coaching. He is survived by his wife and many loved ones.

James Patrick Rice (BSPH ’64) of Conover, devoted husband, father and grandfather, died Aug. 13. Rice was born March 16, 1940, in Blakely. He was the owner and a pharmacist at Duo Drugs for 30 years and was a member of the Catawba Valley Society of Pharmacists. Rice was also involved in St. Alban’s Episcopal Church and the Rock Barn Men’s Golf Association. Rice graduated from UGA, where he was a member of Sigma Nu fraternity. He is survived by his wife of 20 years, Patricia Lowther Rice, four children, six grandchildren, a brother and a sister.

1965–1969

Bob Casel (BBA ’65) of San Jose, Calif., died unexpectedly on Aug. 28. After graduating from the University of Georgia, he received his MBA from the University of San Francisco. Casel went on to hold multiple executive management positions in the Silicon Valley. He was an avid golfer and athlete who enjoyed competition and going to the gym every day. He was a member of the Almaden Country club. He continually emphasized the importance of family and is survived by his loving wife of 43 years, Elaine Casel, and many loved ones.

W. Doyle Dominy (BSA ’65, MS ’67) of Dublin, Ga., died Aug. 22. Dominy was president and co-founder of the Dominy Oil Company. He was a former County Commissioner, past president of the Dublin-Laurens County Chamber of Commerce, former member of the Morris State Bank board of directors, and served on the board of directors of the Dublin-Laurens County Development Authority. Dominy was also a member and past president of the Dublin Rotary Club and served on the board of directors of the Georgia Oilmen’s Association. He was a member of Jefferson Street Baptist Church.

Leroy Dukes (BSED ’65) of Athens died Sept. 4. Dukes served in the U.S. Air Force before earning his degree in education from the University of Georgia. Dukes was a member of Vince Dooley’s first football team and lettered three years for the Bulldogs (1962-64). He also served as an assistant freshman coach in 1965. After graduating, he was the recreation director at Wayne County High School in Jesup and later became head football coach and athletic director at Appling County High School in Baxley. During his coaching career, his teams won state championships in baseball, track, and swimming. He then entered the real estate business in Athens with Southern Realty in 1971. While with Southern Realty, Dukes was a member of the Athens Realtors Million Dollar Club. He went on to become a partner and general manager of the Athens Ramada Inn, where he worked for over 30 years. Dukes was involved with multiple Athens and UGA organizations for which he served as president or chairman: Athens Area Chamber of Commerce, Athens City Club, Athens Touchdown Club, Athens Country Club, Athens Area All-Star Committee, Georgia Athletic Agent’s Regulatory Commission, Clarke County Classic Center Authority, UGA Letterman’s Club and Georgia Ramada Managers Association. In addition to volunteering with these organizations, he was also a member of several boards: Bank South, Hope Haven School, the State Recreation Board and Athens Area Chamber of Commerce. He was a member of Gridiron and treasurer of the College of Education, UGA Alumni Association. He also served as chairman of the 20th and 25th anniversary tributes to Vince Dooley. He enjoyed golfing and was a member of the University of Georgia President’s Club. He was awarded the Distinguished Service and Sam Burke Awards by the Georgia Athletic Coaches Association and was awarded life membership in the GACA in 1991. For his service to high school athletics, he was honored by the National High School Athletic Coaches Association. He is survived by his wife, Susane Davis Dukes, and many loved ones.

Ronnie Luke (BSPH ’65) of Fitzgerald died Aug. 14. Luke was born Aug. 12, 1941, in Fitzgerald and lived in the community for most of his life. He graduated from Fitzgerald High School in 1959 and UGA School of Pharmacy in 1965. He was a pharmacist for Wal-Mart in Douglas and formerly owned/operated Turk’s Pharmacy and Colony Drugs. He worked as a relief pharmacist in South Carolina and Georgia, starting with Pete Glenn Pharmacy in Anderson, S.C. Luke was a member of Abba Baptist Church and had a passion for car racing and dragsters.

Sara McQuaig (AB ’65, Med ’71) of Perry died March 6. She was born March 30, 1935 and was raised in High Shoals. McQuaig graduated from UGA with her master’s degree in guidance and counseling and was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. She worked with the Houston County School System for more than 30 years and was adored by many students and co-workers. After she retired, McQuaig volunteered with Perry Volunteer Outreach as well as other community projects and she started the Angel of Hope Project, which reached out to parents who had lost a child. The service would be available during the Christmas season. She was an avid reader, enjoyed the outdoors and trips to Fernandina Beach, Fla. McQuaig is survived by her husband, Randy, two daughters and her grandchildren.

Sara Anne Stephens (AB ’65) of Athens died June 5. She was born on Dec. 5, 1943, in Greensboro. She attended Wesleyan College in Macon before transferring to UGA where she earned her bachelor’s degree in history. While at the university, Stephens was a member of Phi Mu sorority. She spent most of her life as a homemaker and was an avid gardener and gifted flower arranger. Stephens was a member of the Junior Ladies Garden Club and the president of the Athens Junior Assembly. She was also active in the Alumnae Club of the Phi Mu sorority, serving as rush advisor for several years. In later years, she enjoyed a successful career as the administrative assistant at burton and BURTON, where she worked for 15 years before retiring. Stephens is survived by her two sons and their families.

James Bartow Jenkins (MEd ’66, EdS ’77) of Lawrenceville died Sept. 17. Bartow was a dedicated public servant, a loving husband, father and grandfather and a committed Christian. He is survived by his wife, Mary Anne Sims Jenkins, their five children, Jim Jenkins, Jennifer Ash, Nancy Dutton, Lauren McDougald and Robin Jenkins, and eight grandchildren.

Sara M. Page (BSEd ’66) of Columbus. A Columbus native, Page lived there all her life, teaching and retiring with the Muscogee County School District. She was a charter member of Edgewood United Methodist Church. She is survived by her son and his family.

David Calhoun Williams III (BS ’66, MS ’74, PhD ’76) of Valdosta died May 31, 2008. A member of the American Chemical Society, Williams worked at the Doctor’s Laboratory as a clinical toxicologist. He taught English in Ghana through the Peace Corps and was an avid Bulldogs fan. He is survived by his wife, children, five grandchildren and three sisters.

Elaine G. Williams (BFA ’66, MEd ’67) of Beaufort, S.C., died Oct. 15. After graduating from the University of Georgia with both bachelor’s and master’s degrees, Williams worked in Atlanta for the Fulton County School System as a speech pathologist. She was active in a local theater group as a hobby until a production in which she was appearing moved to New York City and opened on Broadway. When the show closed, Williams decided to remain in New York City and return to her career as a speech pathologist. After many years in Manhattan, she moved to Delaware County in upstate New York in the Catskill Mountains. She later returned to the South to Beaufort, S.C., where she worked for the Beaufort County School System. She and her husband, Charlie Williams, spent five years living and traveling on their sailing vessel before she became a full partner in his business, The Craftseller. Williams is survived by her husband and many loved ones.

Rudy O. Bennett (BBA ’67) of Loganville died Oct. 16. After transferring from Wingate Junior College, Bennett earned his bachelor’s degree in management from the University of Georgia, where he was a member of Theta Chi Fraternity. Bennett was a Mason and was in the Scottish Rite. He was very active in the Boy Scouts of America, North Georgia Council and enjoyed participating in early American re-enactments. He worked for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and Havatampa, but he spent most of his working years with the South Carolina Department of Revenue, from which he retired in 2006. He is survived by his wife, Nell Bennett, and his son, Michael Bennett.

Ketus Conner Cawthon (Med ’67, EdS ’71) of Perry, died Aug. 17. Ketus was born July 29, 1928, in Baxley and lived in Perry since 1949. She was married to Julian Pickard Cawthon for 55 years. Ketus graduated from Georgia State College for Women and completed her master’s and two six-year degrees from UGA. She worked in the Houston County School System for 31 years and was a former member of Delta Kappa Gamma, honorary educational society. She was also a charter member of Muses Book Club, W.M.U., and Roundtable I and participated in a couple’s bridge club for 50 years. She was a longtime member of First Baptist Church of Perry. Ketus served as chairman and coordinator of the Benevolence Committee for 15 years. She is survived by her husband, Julian Cawthon of Perry, four children, eight grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

George Tyler Dukes Jr. (BBA ’67) of Georgetown, Texas, died Oct. 19. Dukes was a member of the Beta-Lambda Chapter of Kappa Sigma Fraternity. He is survived by his wife, Martha Pope Crowder.

William “Bill” L. Easterling (PhD ’67) of Savannah died May 31, 2008. Easterling taught in North Carolina and Puerto Rico before joining the U.S. Air Force in 1952. Leaving active duty in 1957, he returned to school. He traveled to France with a Middlebury College group and stayed to study at the Sorbonne. While in Paris, he also worked for American Express. He returned to the U.S., teaching at the University of Vermont for two years. He continued his teaching career at Cullowhee College before moving to Athens. During a visit to Savannah, Easterling and his wife fell in love with the historic city. After weekends restoring their new home, they moved to Savannah in 1968. He was hired at Armstrong State College as head of the Foreign Language Department. He traveled to Russia, Brazil and Japan increasing his knowledge of diverse cultures and languages. Before and after retirement, Easterling provided translating services to local attorneys and hospitals. He was interested in antiques, having a shop in his home for a time; amateur theatre, spending time with the Armstrong Masquers, the Savannah Little Theatre and the Asbury Church theatre group; hosting foreign visitors, who were regularly at his home; and piano playing. He loved to spend time with people and shared his home with many. His dog, Sandy, was a constant source of company, and he cherished spending time with his two grandchildren. He is survived by many loved ones.

Harlan Hugh Hostetter (BBA ’67) of Savannah died Sept. 27 after a battle with cancer. After graduating from the University of Georgia, Hostetter moved to Charleston, S.C., and opened a Customs House Brokerage. He was the youngest person in the country to have attained an Import Export Brokerage License. He was a member of First Scots Presbyterian where his twin granddaughters, Ellison and Spencer, were recently baptized. He was an active member in the Charleston Hibernian Society, along with various trade and business organizations. Hostetter returned to Savannah in 1979 and worked for Colonial Shipping. He was also a board member of Atlantic Bank until its sale to Bank South. His diverse career took him to places across the country and all over the world. He valued meeting and maintaining relationships with people from a variety of places and backgrounds. He eventually returned to the family real estate trade. He co-founded Pinnacle Commercial Real Estate with Jim Bryant and was involved in several other real estate ventures, partnerships and developments in recent years. Hostetter was a member of Kirk of the Isles Presbyterian Church, Realtors Commercial Alliance and Savannah Board of Realtors. He was on the advisory board for Mercy Housing and was active in both the Good News Jail Ministries and the Disciples of Hope Prayer Group. Hostetter is survived by his wife, Belinda Sharkey Hostetter, and his four children.

J. Bruce Jerles (BBA ’67) of Birmingham, Ala., died June 8, 2008. “Poppa” was deeply loved by his family and friends for his kind and giving spirit. Always enjoying life, he had a great sense of humor and was a member of Christ Church United Methodist. He is survived by his wife, three daughters, three grandsons, and two sisters.

Jim Morrison (BBA ’67) of Gainesville, Ga., died Jan. 19. Morrison graduated from Gainesville High School and received his bachelor’s degree in business from UGA in 1967. He began his professional career as a math teacher and vocational tech coordinator. He also owned and operated Morrison and Associates Real Estate Appraisers for the past 31 years. He was a member of Gainesville First United Methodist Church, the International Organization of Real Estate Appraisers, NRA Golden Eagles, and many other civic, social and professional organizations. Morrison loved water sports such as skiing, cave diving and diving for missing persons when he was younger. He also enjoyed hunting and fishing, of which he won numerous awards for his participation in bass fishing events. He loved nature and animals and proudly owned three German shepherds. Morrison always remained a teenager at heart and loved working with young people. The most important thing in his life was his true love for his wife, Louise, his son, Thor, and his three grandchildren.

Lynn M. Bennett (BSHE ’68) of Darby, Mont., died Aug. 22. After graduating from the University of Georgia in 1968, Bennett taught fifth grade for several years before going to work for the state of Georgia as a home economics engineer. When their daughter, Sara Anne, was born, Bennett stopped working. Bennett was a wonderful seamstress and was a member of both the Kiokee Baptist Church in Appling and Living Faith Ministries in Darby. She was preceded in death by her daughter, Sara Anne, her parents and one brother. She is survived by her husband, John, of Darby, and many loved ones.

Carolyn Eason Hilliard (BSEd ’68) of Tifton died Feb. 25. Hilliard graduated from the University of Georgia with a bachelor’s degree in education and went on to teach 11th grade English at Tift County High School. After retiring, she served as education coordinator at the Georgia Agrirama. She was an active member of Tifton First United Methodist Church and an officer in both the Azalea Garden Club and the Council of Garden Clubs. She was an avid bridge player and instructor. Hilliard was predeceased by a son, Harry Hathaway Hilliard. She is survived by her husband, F. Dean Hilliard Jr., two children, Diedre Vondell Hilliard and Fred Deal Hilliard III, and many loved ones.

Henry Kellum (AB ’68) died Aug. 16. Kellum was born March 18, 1946, in Thomaston. He graduated from UGA in 1966 and received his law degree from mercer University in 1970. Kellum was a practicing attorney in Atlanta. A devoted husband, father, brother and friend, he enjoyed playing golf, tennis and guitar with his son, Tom. Kellum and his wife, Diane, attended many UGA football games together, especially the Georgia v. Florida game. He is survived by his wife and their son.

Gerald Irwin Lawhorn (BBA ’68) of Albany, Ga., died Oct. 8. As a child, he was involved with Boy Scouts, beginning in Cub Pack 33 in 1954 and earning his Eagle Award in 1961. After graduating from Worth County High School in 1964, he attended Abraham Baldwin Junior College and graduated in 1966 at the top of his class. He then attended the University of Georgia business school and graduated in the top 1% of his class in 1968. While in college, he was actively involved in the Phi Sigma Delta service fraternity at Abraham Baldwin and Phi Kappa Tau social fraternity and various scholastic honor societies at UGA. At age 15, Lawhorn opened a gas station in Sylvester and supported himself through high school and college. In 1969, he relocated to Griffin to pursue a career in retail gasoline marketing. He then started an independent distributing company that he named OK Oil Inc., which was later changed to PetroSouth Inc. Lawhorn grew the company from a mere four locations in the beginning to over 250 now. The company has self-service tie-ins with convenience food stores in Georgia, Florida and Alabama. The main office is still in Griffin and there are branch offices in Albany, Ga. As an adult, Lawhorn remained active with Boy Scouts and was involved in a scout troop in the early 1970s, for which he served as scoutmaster for seven years. During this time, he made it possible for all 18 members of his troop to attend the National Jamboree in 1973. His company still sponsors this group. He founded the Gerald I. Lawhorn Canoe Base and Training Center (dedicated in 1988 and now Lawhorn Scout Base) at the Thunder Scout Reservation on the Flint River in Upson County, Ga. He made sure that the base was opened to all interested church, school, youth and civic groups. He had adult training at Philmont Scout Reservation, hosted council camporees and was instrumental in the procurement of the present Flint River Council Office. He received the Silver Beaver Award in 1986, the Paul Harris Fellowship Award by Rotary International in 1989, and the American Legion Good Citizenship Citation in 1987, which was presented to him by the class of 15 Eagles of Spalding County and the American Legion Post #15. He received the Silver Antelope Award in 2004, and on March 20, 2006, he was awarded the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award. Lawhorn was an active member of the Griffin Civitan Club from 1968-1972. He was responsible for the Griffin Civitan Club becoming a charter partner and sponsoring a Boy Scout Troop. He was also a member of the Griffin Spalding County Chamber of Commerce, the Spalding County Chapter of Ducks Unlimited, the Griffin Moose Club and the Griffin Elks Lodge. In 1979, he developed Cherokee Rose, a sporting facility that was used by many different youth organizations, including Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, special needs organizations, the Kiwanis, Home Builder of America and many others, while under his ownership. Lawhorn was a member of the Highlands Country Club in Highlands, N.C., and was a supporter of the Highland Hospital. He was a member of the Rotary Club and served on the executive board of Midway Recovery System for drug addiction. He was an active supporter of the Junior Achievement Program of Griffin High School, as well as the Griffin High School Band Boosters Club. Lawhorn founded and developed Mobile Telephone and Pager, and he had the first working car phone in Georgia. He also founded BuyPass the System in Atlanta, a point of sale credit/debit card transaction processing company that changed credit card processing from paper to electronic. BuyPass is now part of National Business Systems and is one of the largest credit/debit card electronic transaction processors in the nation. Lawhorn was diagnosed with ALS/Lou Gehrig’s disease on June 6, 2005. Since then, he sponsored and pioneered the development of ScoutParents, BSA (http://www.ScoutParents.org). He was also a sponsor of the BSA National Parent Initiative that was announced at the BSA National meeting in May 2006. He was the sponsor of and funded the ALS Association support meeting of southwest Georgia, which will be used as a model for the U.S. The first meeting was held in Albany, Ga., on Feb. 2, 2006. In addition, Lawhorn was a sponsor and is the founder of the ALS Patient Initiative of Georgia with Emory University Medical College, Middle Georgia Medical College and ALS Association of Georgia (http://www.ALS.link.org). The Muscular Dystrophy Association honored Gerald Lawhorn with the 2007 Personal Achievement Award for Georgia. Since 1991, he and his company, PetroSouth Inc., have supported the Muscular Dystrophy Association by selling shamrocks and sponsoring golf tournaments and skeet shoots. During his last year, he started Choose to Reach for Jesus, a deeply personal commitment to share his love for Jesus and to witness his passion for Jesus to others through the coin ministry (http://www.CTRFJ.org). He is survived by his wife, JoAnn Lawhorn.

Cherry Taylor (BSEd ’68) of Macon, died August 27, 2008. She was born July 2, 1947 and raised in Vidalia. After graduating from UGA, Taylor taught school in Jefferson and at Tattnall Square Academy in Macon. Taylor was a member of Ingleside Baptist Church where she was very involved with the children’s ministry. She was also a member of the Junior League of Macon and an active volunteer at the Museum of Arts and Sciences. Taylor was preceded in death by her husband, John Herschel Taylor, Jr.

Robert Bronnum (AB ’69) of Atlanta died June 11, 2008. Bronnum was a manager of Safeco Insurance Company for more than 20 years and manager of Bronnum and Associates Insurance Agency since 1991. He is survived by his wife and daughters.

Charles Robert Choate III (BBA ’69) of Tifton died June 4, 2007. Choate was a retired manager of contract business and a member of the First Baptist Church of Tifton. He is survived by his wife, Betsy, their two children and four grandchildren.

William F. Hanley Jr. (BBA ’69) of Nicholson died Oct. 2. He is survived by his wife, Judy Hanley, three children, Dana Hanley, Andy Martin and David Martin, six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

John Francis Head III (BBA ’69) of Atlanta died Oct. 9 after battling cancer. After graduating from Northside high School, Head attended Presbyterian College for one year before moving on to the University of Georgia. He was a member of Kappa Alpha Order. He began his real estate career with Pope and Carter before starting Heritage Equities with Howe Whitman. He later moved his family to Macon, where he bought W. Supply Company. This was the start of his love for the lumber business. He went on to purchase Anderson McGriff in Atlanta and later started Atlanta Commercial Millwork. As a reflection of his adventuresome personality, Head also owned a saw mill in Russia for a period of time. However, his greatest business joy was his purchase of the Abaco Inn in Elbow Cay of the Bahamas. He loved the lifestyle of the islands and greatly enjoyed the life of an hotelier. This business venture eventually led him to purchase a beautiful piece of property on Great Guanna Cay. There, he developed Bakers Bay Ocean and Golf Club, a project that brought him countless hours of enjoyment. John was an avid hunter and fisherman, and he loved traveling with his dog, named Son, searching for the best hunting places. Head was a member of Piedmont Driving Club, the Roundtable, Buckhead Lions Club and the Homosassa Hookers Fishing Club. He was a vivacious storyteller with a vivid imagination and an infectious laugh. He is survived by his three daughters, Anne Reagan Head, Jacqueline Crisci and Lauren Head, his grandsons, Bennett and Winston Crisci, and many loved ones.

J. Edward Peede (BBA ’69) of Brunswick died Sept. 25, after a long battle with cancer. Peede attended the University of Georgia on a music scholarship and was president of Sigma Nu Fraternity. He graduated with a bachelor’s in business administration and went on to work 16 years for Armstrong World Industries, a worldwide manufacturer and marketer of interior furnishings. Peede moved to Brunswick in 1985 and became chairman and CEO of Interior Products Inc., an international manufacturer of patented bendable substrates. Peede was on the College of Coastal Georgia’s foundation for many years and was a past member of both the Brunswick-Golden Isles Chamber of Commerce and its executive committee and the Rotary Club. He was also a member of the Brunswick-Glynn County Manufacturing Association and the First Baptist Church of Jesup. Peede was an avid sportsman, accomplished wing shooter and sport fisherman. He was a member of Ducks Unlimited, an active participant of the Sea Island Shooting School, Southern Kingfish Association, Two Way Sports Fishing Club and the Altamaha Waterfowl Association. He is survived by his wife, Paula, two daughters, Stephanie Sorrells and Melissa Hasty, and many loved ones.

Bill Shingler (AB ’69, MPA ’72) of Donalsonville, died Aug. 13 as a result of a motor vehicle accident. Shingler was born Oct. 4, 1946 and graduated from Marion Military Institute in 1964. He attended Middle Georgia College and then received his master’s in public administration from UGA. He graduated from the Woodrow Wilson School of Law in Atlanta in 1983 and began his own practice in Donalsonville.

1970–1974

George A. Brutscher (JD ’70) of New Castle, Del., died Oct. 11. Brutscher earned his bachelor’s degree from Notre Dame University and his doctor of law degree from the University of Georgia. He was a highly respected member of the Chester County Bar Association and practiced law as an attorney in Kennett Square, where he was a senior partner at Brutscher, Foley, Milliner and Land, from 1970 until 2008. Among many other clients, he was the long-time solicitor for New Garden Township. Brutscher was an avid sportsman and especially enjoyed hunting with his sons, brother and friends in Potter County, Pa., and at his second home in Ovando, Mont. He is survived by his two sons, Geoffrey J. and George Barton Brutscher, and many loved ones.

Richard Cannon (BSA ’70) of Hattiesburg, Miss., died June 15, 2008. Owner and operator of Cannon Enterprises, Cannon was a member of Bellevue Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife of 28 years, five children, siblings, eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Inez Schwalls Keene (M ’70) died on Aug. 31. She was born in Johnson County and attended Adrian High School where she graduated in 1942. In the fall of 1942, she attended Andrew Junior College in Cuthbert where she studied education. In 1944, she graduated with her associate’s degree in education and in 1945, she took her first teaching job in the Johnson County School System at Scott Elementary School. From 1945 to 1958, Keene taught grades 1 through 7 while also attending Georgia Southern College in Statesboro. She received her bachelor’s degree in education there in 1951 and in 1959 received her master’s degree in education from Mercer University in Macon. She was later employed at East Laurens High School, Treutlen County High School and Treutlen Elementary School, where she worked as both a teacher and student guidance counselor. During this period, she attended UGA where she received her doctoral degree in education. She served as the principal of Treutlen County Primary School from 1973 to 1981 and in August of 1981, Keene retired. She worked part-time as a special education teacher with the Treutlen County School System until 1985, when she decided it was time to enjoy life. Keene was a member of the Dublin Moose Lodge, the First United Methodist Church and the Friendship Sunday School Class.

C. Stephen Malone (AB ’70) of Panama City Beach, Fla., died Oct. 29. After receiving his bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Georgia, Malone went on to earn a law degree from Emory University. He was an accomplished attorney for 35 years and was a member of the Georgia and Florida Bar Associations. He owned and operated the Silver Sands Motel from 1989 until 1995, and he was employed by the City of Panama City as the director of planning, land use and code enforcement from 1996 until 2000. He was a member of Woodlawn United Methodist Church, where he sang in the choir. He is survived by his wife of 39 years, Judy H. Malone.

Stacey Matherly (EdS ’70) of Woodstock died Oct. 24. Matherly served in the U.S. Army during World War II and worked as a high school counselor for Fulton County Schools for many years. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Jean Matherly, and his daughter, Mary Jaye Harrison.

Mary Amelia Trest (BS ’70) of Athens died Oct. 15. Trest was a native of Habersham County and graduated from South Habersham High School before attending the University of Georgia and earning her bachelor’s degree in microbiology. She was a member of Daughters of the American Revolution and First United Methodist Church. She is survived by her husband, Gary Trest, three children, Juliana, Jeff and Frank Trest, and many loved ones.

John Dickerson Sr. (BSEd ’71) of Gainesville, Ga., died Oct. 6. Dickenson was a member of Central Baptist Church. He was preceded in death by his wife, Ann Dickerson. Dickerson was a U.S. veteran. He is survived by his son, John T. Dickerson Jr., and his granddaughters.

Roger Jackson (BSA ’71, MS ’75, EDS ’95) of Conyers died June 23, 2007.

Phillip Lee Secrist (EdD ’71) of Marietta died Sept. 4. After graduating from Blount County High School in 1946, Secrist joined the U.S. Marines and went to boot camp on Parris Island, S.C. He served as a teletype operator while at the Marine Air Base in Cherry Point, N.C. In addition, he played football for the Cherry Point Marine team and was awarded a football scholarship to the University of Tennessee. It was there that he met his wife, Kay Kimsey, whom he married in 1949. After graduating from the University of Tennessee in 1952, Secrist accepted a commission in the Army infantry and served during the Korean War. He was discharged from active duty in 1954 and continued to serve in the Army Reserves for several years before resigning with the rank of captain in 1965. He went on to receive his master’s in physical education administration from Auburn University, and in the fall of 1955, he accepted a job at an Atlanta high school, where he began a teaching career that would span 48 years. He taught history and had a particular interest in the American Civil War. Later, he earned degrees in history and social science at the University of Georgia and authored two books and more than a dozen articles in scholarly and popular magazines on the Civil War. Secrist served as president of the Atlanta City War Round Table, was a 10-year member of the Georgia Civil War Commission, commander of the Atlanta World War II Roundtable, coordinator of social studies in Cobb County public schools, state president of the Georgia Council of Social Science Teachers and chairman of the Cobb County board of commissioners. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Kay Secrist, and many loved ones.

Eddie L. Smith (MEd ’71) of Butner, N.C., died Aug. 25. Smith graduated from Mercer University with a degree in divinity before earning his master’s degree in education from the University of Georgia. He served as a pastor in Georgia for 20 years before spending 10 years working in the federal prison system in Atlanta before moving to North Carolina in 1981. While working at the Federal Correctional Institute in Butner, he established a college transfer program through Vance-Granville Community College, along with a four-year program through Shaw University; his belief was that education was a means of reducing the prison population. In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Butner in 1992, Smith and a former Butner resident, Ben Patrick, co-wrote a 245-page history entitled Voices from the Field. He was instrumental in the founding of the South Granville Memorial Gardens Cemetery in Butner, along with the restoration of many desecrated cemeteries in the area. In 1998, he wrote The History of the First Baptist Church of Butner. He also wrote and published the Butner Review, a monthly community newsletter. Smith was active in both the Georgia Lodge and the Butner Lodge, and in April 2001, he was presented with his 50 Year Masonic Pin. He was preceded in death by his wife, Virginia Nan Smith. He is survived by two daughters, Patricia McLaughlin and Deborah Hurst, two sons, Lee Smith and Mark Smith, and many loved ones.

Margaret B. Welch (BFA ’71) of Buena Vista died June 18.

Dorothy E. Williford (MEd ’71) of Tifton died Aug. 23. Before earning her master’s degree from the University of Georgia, Williford graduated from Valdosta State University. She was a teacher for the Broward County, Fla., school system. In 1985 she was named Teacher of the Year by the National Teacher’s Registry. She was a member of the bowling league in Tift County and of Pineview Holiness Baptist Church. She was also active in the literacy program in Tift County. She is survived by her three sons, Frankie, Jimmy and Mike Williford.

Walter Zimmerman (BBA ’71) of Clifton, NJ, died May 10.

William Bibby (Med ’72) of Folkston died Dec. 24, 2007.

Andrew Shellhorse (BSFR ’72) of Cartersville died April 19.

Mary Ann Hensley (MEd ’73) of Duluth died Oct. 14. Hensley was department chair of the Home Economics Department at Atlanta Area Technical School. She graduated from West Virginia University before earning her master’s degree in education from the University of Georgia. She was a member of Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church. She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert Coleman Hensley. Survivors include her two daughters, Robin Prater and Judith Cole, and four grandchildren.

Everett Douglas Briscoe (BBA ’74) of Dartmouth, England, died June 5. Briscoe was born and raised in Jackson and graduated from Jackson High School. After receiving his bachelor’s degree from UGA in 1974, he visited the Virgin Islands and fell in love with sailing. He purchased a boat and began a career chartering boats. His profession led him to meet his future wife, Allison Grant, who worked as his cook and on-board nurse. They fell in love and returned to her hometown of Dartmouth, England to get married. They started a family and Briscoe opened “The Canvas Factory,” which sold canvas sails, bags and boat covers around the world. He still loved the ocean and later purchased a sail boat to sail around the world. Not only was Briscoe an avid sailor, but a devoted father to his three girls as well. He is survived by his wife and daughters.

Margaret Choate (MEd ’74) of Tifton died June 16, 2008. A retired teacher and librarian, Choate was a member of Tifton’s First Baptist Church, where she was a member of the Cheerful Workers Sunday School Class. She was a member of the Tifton-Tift County recreation board, the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Colonial Dames, the magna Charter Dames and the Azalea Garden Club. She served as president, among other offices, of the Garden Club. Choate was also a Life Flower Show Judge. She is survived by one son, grandchildren and many loved ones.

Carl Franklin Davis Jr. (AB ’74) of Cairo died Aug. 31. Davis served 19 years as a probation officer in the juvenile justice system. He also served for 13 years as the mayor of Climax. Davis was a member of P.O.A. G., the Sherriff’s Association, Masonic Lodge Orion #8 and the Shrine Club. He was also a member of Climax Baptist Church and the Caring Christians Sunday school class. He is survived by his wife, Beverly Allen Davis, and many loved ones. 

Thomas Anthony Ellis (BBA ’74) of McDonough died Sept. 22. After graduating from the University of Georgia with a management degree in 1974, Ellis served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy from 1975-79 following his commission from the U.S. Naval Academy Officer Candidate School in Newport, R.I. He graduated from the Walter F. George School of Law at Mercer University and was admitted to the Georgia Bar Association on June 21, 1982. He was a practicing attorney specializing in real estate law in McDonough for 26 years. Ellis was actively involved in Community Bible Church, facilitating classes and serving on the security team. Throughout his battle with cancer, he found strength and encouragement from his loyal friends, daughters and grandson. He is survived by his daughters, Robyn Ellis Vaughn and Aubrey Ellis, and many loved ones.

Betty Miller Fox (AB ’74) of Athens died Sept. 24. She was a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Georgia. She was employed by the University of Georgia Libraries since graduating. Fox was a member of Vienna First Baptist Church. She is survived by her husband, Edward J. Fox, and her sisters, Ann Miller Benton, Ginger Cobb and Melody Morgan.

Montez Whitfield Jolly (Med ’74) of Seneca, SC, died Aug. 13. She was a native of Oconee County and an elementary school teacher for more than 42 years in the Fulton County School System in Atlanta. She graduated from Asheville Teachers College and later received her master’s in elementary education from UGA. Jolly was a member of Trinity Baptist Church, a former Deacon and had taught the Elizabeth Tribble Sunday school class. She was the last surviving member of her immediate family.

Clement Sansone (BS ’74) of Decatur died Nov. 2. Sansone attended Piedmont College before transferring to the University of Georgia and earning his bachelor’s degree in psychology. After college, he went to work for Scottish Rite and later moved on to the Atlanta Outpatient Surgery Center, where he became a director. He then served as the CEO of the Northlake Surgery Center until he retired in 2007. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne Sansone, and his sons, Brian and John Sansone.

Anne Shecut-Parker (BFA ’74) of Atlanta died Oct. 12 after a long battle with cancer. She was an accomplished graphic artist with Emory University of Atlanta. While there, she achieved many awards among competing graphic artists from other universities. Following her employment with Emory University, she built her own successful career as a freelance graphic artist. She is survived by her husband, William R. Parker, and her son, Ashley Shecut Parker.

1975–1979

Edward Dechau Jr. (MEd ’75) of Flowery Branch died Oct. 12. He served in the U.S. Air Force for six years. He then taught school and retired after 30 years of service. He is survived by his wife, Azalean Dechau, his children, Gregory Dechau, Gretchen Franklin, Stephanie DeCampli and Steve Russel, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

Howard Henderson (MA ’75) of Chamblee died Sept. 23. He is survived by his wife, Shirley Henderson.

Danny Mabry (MPA ’75) of Carrollton died Oct. 25. Mabry earned a degree in political science from West Georgia College before graduating from the University of Georgia with a master’s in public administration. Mabry spent his career in city and county management. He served as city manager of Carrollton, Villa Rica and Bowdon. He also worked as a local government consultant with Keck & Wood, an engineering and consulting firm based in Atlanta. He served on the board of Tanner Health Servies for nine years and was a member of the Georgia City/County Managers Association and the International City/County Manager Association. Mabry loved the Georgia Bulldogs, beach music, NASCAR and reading. He is survived by his wife of 23 years, Susan Mabry, and many loved ones.

Faye Poole Moore (MEd ’75) of Toccoa, died Aug. 20. She is survived by four children, her sister, eight grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and her nieces and nephews.

June Pendley (BSPH ’75) of Powder Springs died Oct. 21. Pendley graduated from both McEachern High School and the University of Georgia with honors before working with Dunaway Drug Stores and Kenmar Pharmacy. Her passion was her flower garden. She is survived by her two sons, Justin and Tyler Miller.

Tommy Sellers (BBA ’75) of Albany, Ga., died April 24. Sellers graduated from Westover High School before graduating from the University of Georgia in 1975. He was a member of Theta Chi Fraternity. He went on to earn his master’s degree from Valdosta State University. He was a member of First Baptist Church. He is survived by his three children, Ken, Jack, and Meredith Sellers and former wife, Julie Sellers.

Anne Trogdon (MEd ’75) of Waverly died May 26, 2008. A teacher and librarian in several counties until her retirement in 1984, she volunteered at Hospice of the Golden Isles and manna House. She and her husband were founding members of the Episcopal Church of Our Savior at Honey Creek in 2007. She is survived by her husband, daughter and grandchildren.

Alfred E. Zappala (MA ’75) of West Haven, Conn., died suddenly Oct. 27. Zappala earned bachelor’s degrees in French and English from Augusta University before receiving his master’s in linguistics from the University of Georgia. While at the University of Georgia, he was a Ph.D. candidate in German linguistics, a teaching assistant research fellow and a professor emeritus of German. He spoke five languages. Zappala served in the U.S. Army for six years, and he was subsequently employed as a training coordinator for the Army Reserve officers at Fort Knox, Ky. He was a lifelong democrat and attended President Bill Clinton’s Inaugural Ball. He had recently returned from a trip to Italy for a reunion with old school friends and family. He is survived by his daughters, Patrizia O’Cone, Claudia McKeon and Monica Inman.

Leon Crenshaw Sr. (MEd ’76) of Columbus died Aug. 22. Before earning his master’s degree at the University of Georgia, Crenshaw graduated from the Tuskegee Institute in 1966. He was later a doctoral student at Vanderbilt University. He was a member of the Fourth Street Baptist Church and its deacon board before becoming a member and pastor of the True Divine Baptist Church in Phoenix City, Ala. He was also a member of the Green Bay Packers football team and Kappa Alpha Psi. He taught at DeVry Institute of Technology and retired as an educator from Terrell County High School. He is survived by his wife, Annie Oliver-Crenshaw, and many loved ones.

Rex Carlton Jones (MEd ’77) of McDonough died June 24. Jones retired in 1996 from the DeKalb County School System. He was a member of the McDonough First United Methodist Church and volunteered with Skills USA. He was an avid golfer and enjoyed spending time with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Ann Jones, his daughter, Kay Hill, and two grandchildren.

Thomas Logan McTeer (ABJ ’78) of Savannah died Oct. 18. McTeer was a graduate of Benedictine Military School and the University of Georgia. He is survived by his brother, Henry Webb McTeer III, and six nieces.

Ellen Petersen (BSA ’77) of East Meadow, NY, died Sept. 15, 2007.

Alexa Lunsford Ray (BSEd ’78) of St. Cloud, Fla., died Sept. 27.

Jennifer Lynn Hampton (BSED ’79) of Franklin died Sept. 2. After graduating from the University of Georgia with an education degree, she went on to earn her MBA from Georgia State University in 1989 and a law degree from the University of Chicago Law School in 1993. She was admitted to the Georgia State Bar in 1993. She was a professor for LaGrange College. Hampton was an active volunteer for Animal Rescue Groups and often fostered homes for dogs, even adopting some of them. She did pro bono legal work for the American Red Cross and Decatur Legal Aid Society. She is survived by her mother, Betty Hampton, and many loved ones.

Michael L. Kelley (BSFR ’79) of Cedar Grove died Sept. 4. Kelley was a retired U.S. Marine, a member of the First Baptist Church or LaFayette and was employed with the Georgia Forestry Service at Rome. He is survived by his wife, Cynthia Millican Kelley, and his daughters, Sarah Lee Kelley and Laura Frances Kelley.

1980–1984

James M. Benson (BBA ’80) of Murfreesboro, Tenn., died Aug. 8. Benson was a native of Rockford, Ill. While studying at UGA, he lettered in swimming and was a member of the Rutherford Society. Benson was a member of First United Methodist Church and the director of information systems with Middle Tennessee Medical Center. He is survived by his wife, Sandy, and two daughters.

June W. Gray (EdD ’80) of Atlanta died July 12. Gray worked as a nurse practitioner and served the Atlanta community at a number of local hospitals, volunteering in free clinics and serving as treasurer of the Georgia Nursing Association. She was a member of the North Atlanta Bible Chapel. She is survived by her husband, Robert McLean Sr., and four children, Robert M. Gray Jr., David Gray, Paul Gray and Martha Herb, along with six grandchildren and six great grandchildren.

Robert Gregory Sikora (MS ’80) died on Aug. 7, 2007. He received his bachelor’s degree from Purdue University in 1972 and in 1980, received his master’s in science from the UGA College of Pharmacy.

William H. Winkie (EdS ’80) of Winterville died Sept. 2. He is survived by his wife, Linda Winkie, and his children, Cassandra, John, Billy, Jonathan, Hughie, Tracy, and Amanda, and his 11 grandchildren.

Harriett Evelyn Brown (MEd ’81, EdS ’83) of Hartwell died Oct. 14. Brown graduated from Appalachian State University before earning two degrees in education from the University of Georgia. She was a librarian for Hartwell Elementary School for 32 years. Brown was a member of the Hartwell First United Methodist Church and the Handbell Choir. She was a member and past-president of the Pilot Club of Hartwell, as well as a member of the Hart County Retired Teachers Association, Georgia Retired Teachers, Red Hat Club, John Benson Chapter DAR, Delta Kappa Gamma, Girl Scouts of America, Southern Order Storytellers and Georgia Library Media Association. She is survived by many loved ones, including her brother, Boyce Brown, and sister, Edwina Mintz.

Stephen Robinson (AB ’82) of Atlanta died June 19, 2008. A member of the Army ROTC while at the University, he continued to serve his country after graduation. Robinson was an advisor of communications at the Mitre Corporation. As a Boy Scout Leader, he loved camping, racing and animals. He is survived by his wife, children, parents, sister, and grandmother.

Benjamin Rountree (DPA ’82) of Mansfield, Ohio, died Jan. 7. Rountree was the dean of technology and workforce development at North Central State College and a native of Montgomery, Ala. He died of an apparent heart attack while watching the Ohio State University championship football game. Rountree received his doctorate of public administration in health policy and administration from UGA in 1982. Prior to that he earned his bachelor’s degree in 1971 from The American University in Washington, D.C. and a master’s degree from Auburn University in 1974. Rountree’s career spanned over 30 years of health care management, teaching and management consulting. Earlier in his career he held positions as a research and staff assistant to political members in the White House. He was once an associate professor in the School of Health Sciences at Clayton College and State University in Morrow. He was a consultant in Cleveland, Ga., and worked for IBM in Houston, Sutter Health in northern California, HayGroup, Inc. in Atlanta, the University of Missouri in Columbia, Mo., UGA, and as a hospital administrator in Memphis and Washington, D.C. He has a long list of published work, papers and presentations as well. Rountree was a member of Grace Episcopal Church, the Leadership Unlimited class and Mansfield Rotary Club. He loved golf, college football and riding his motorcycle. He is survived by his wife of 18 years, Sydney, his daughter and two grandchildren.

Dale Kitch (EdD ’83) of Brunswick died Aug. 19. Kitch served in the U.S. Navy for 23 years before retiring in 1972. While in the service, he established the data processing program at Brunswick Junior College and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Georgia Southern University. He completed his doctoral degree at the University of Georgia in 1983. He went on to spend the next 18 years as a community college professor and spent most of his time at Brunswick Junior College. He later retired from the University System of Georgia and taught for the University of Maryland overseas division and traveled throughout Europe and Asia. He enjoyed painting, wood-carving, art history and golf. He is survived by his wife, Ruth Kitch, his son, Gary Kitch, and his daughters, Jackie Borgard and Kay Readdick.

Geri Lee Naylor (MA ’83) of Flowery Branch, died Aug. 24. She was born July 21, 1958, in Savannah and graduated from Savannah Country Day High School in 1976. In 1982, she graduated from Auburn University with her bachelor’s degree in English and then received her master’s degree in public relations from UGA in 1984. Naylor worked for Morton Vardeman & Carlson Strategic Marketing, advertising and public relations in Gainesville, Ga. She was an active member of Buford First United Methodist Church. Naylor is survived by her husband of 22 years, Joseph Naylor and several family members.

Robert Jesse (Bobby) Slocumbe Jr. (AB ’83) of Athens died Oct. 1. Slocumbe graduated from Samuel Elbert Academy in 1979 and was an Eagle Scout. He then attended the University of Georgia, where he was a member of Sigma Chi Fraternity. After graduating with an economics degree, he went on to own Slocumbe Oil Company in Elberton. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth E. Slocumbe, a daughter, Lauren Elizabeth Slocumbe, and a son, Robert J. Slocumbe III.

1985–1989

Ivan Kyser (MEd ’86) of Lawrenceville, died June 25, 2007. He received his associate’s degree from Georgia Perimeter College in 1972 and his bachelor’s degree in 1973 from Georgia State University. He furthered his education at UGA where he received his master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling in 1986 and then finished with his doctoral degree from Columbia Pacific University in 2000.

Bruce Alan Ott (MEd ’89, EdD ’95) of Arnoldsville died Oct. 3. Ott was the program director of the Respiratory Therapy Department at Athens Technical College, where he taught for 24 years. He is survived by his wife, Clare Marie Connell, and his two children, George and Kristin Ott.

1990-1994

Susan Joy Duckett (ABJ ’90) of Rossville died Sept. 6 after a courageous struggle with cancer. Duckett was a member of Wesley United Methodist Church. She graduated from Rossville High School, Dalton College and the University of Georgia, specializing in journalism and art. She was a gifted artist and had a particular talent for portraits. She was interested in film production and studied in both New York and Los Angeles. Her hobbies included playing the clarinet, gardening, gourmet cooking and animals. She is survived by her parents, Fred and Joy Duckett, and many loved ones.

Lee Walter Lewallen (AB ’92) of Clarkesville, died Aug. 11. Lewallen was born in Hall County on Nov. 9, 1969. He was a member of Clarkesville Baptist Church and was a middle school teacher for six years. Lewallen was an avid outdoorsman who loved to hunt and fish. Also a sports enthusiast, he enjoyed coaching football, baseball, basketball and golf. He is survived by his parents and daughter.

Gloria Hannah Smith (EdS ’92) of Royston died Oct. 16. Smith was a retired teacher and a member of Royston First United Methodist Church, Friends of the Royston Library and the Georgia Retired Teachers Association. She is survived by her husband, Walter R. Smith, and two sons, Adam and Andrew Smith.

Brenda Lois Graham (MEd ’93) of Virginia Beach, Va., died Sept. 6. She received her bachelor’s degree from Savannah State University and her nursing degree from Bronx Community College before earning her master’s in rehabilitation counseling from the University of Georgia. During her nursing career, she was a professor of nursing at South College in Savannah and was a member of nursing staffs at several hospitals, including Athens Regional Medical Center. She is survived by her daughter, LaTrelle D. Jackson, and many loved ones.

Cary Smith (BBA ’93) of Saint Simons Island died June 2, 2008. An avid golfer and sports fan, Smith was a loyal friend to both those he grew up with and who he met in his later years. An infectious smile won the hearts of everyone he met. Smith is survived by his parents, brothers and many loved ones.

David C. Stiles (EdD ’93) of Mobile, Ala., died on Sept. 7. Stiles graduated from Young Harris College in 1979 and went on to earn two master’s degrees in history and educational administration from Georgia State University. He then received his doctoral degree in educational administration from the University of Georgia. He began his teaching career as a history teacher in Gwinnett County at Norcross High School in 1983. He was promoted to assistant principal and went on to hold that position at three high schools before being named principal of Shiloh High School in 1993. He subsequently served as director of organizational development from 2002-2007. In 2007, Stiles received his certification as a financial advisor. He was a member of Education’s Leadership Georgia Academy and the University of Alabama’s Superintendant’s Academy. He was president of the Alabama School Communicator’s Association and of the board of trustees for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of Alabama and the Gulf Coast. Most recently, he was superintendant of the new Saraland City school district. He is survived by his wife, Laura Phillips Stiles, his sons, David and Charles Stiles, his mother, Charlotte Craig Stiles, and many loved ones.

1995–1999

Nancy Tice Baird (EdD ’95) of Commerce died Oct. 11. Baird earned degrees at both the University of Tennessee and Indiana University before graduating from the University of Georgia with a doctoral degree in educational leadership in 1995. Her career in education spanned many years, and she retired in 2006 as the assistant superintendant of Commerce City Schools. She is survived by her husband of 43 years, Ancil Roscoe Baird Jr., and her two sons, John David and Andrew Tice Baird.

Troy Carlton Henson (BMus ’96) died Aug. 15 at Northside Hospital in Atlanta following an extended illness. Henson was born in Hall County on Aug. 25, 1973, and graduated from West Hall High School. He earned his bachelor’s degree in music education from UGA in 1996 and was a member of the Redcoat Marching Band. Henson earned his master’s degree from Auburn University in 1998. He was a member of the Music Educator’s National Conference, Georgia Music Educator’s Association, National Educator’s Association, the National Band Association, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and Kappa Kappa Psi (honorary). He was also the 2005-2006 Teacher of the Year at Pinckneyville Middle School and received the National Band Association’s Citation of Excellence. Henson had served as band director at Chestatee Middle School, Pinckneyville Middle School, and at the time of his illness, had just accepted the position as band director at Piney Grove Middle School. Henson is survived by his parents, brother and sister-in-law, grandmother, niece and nephew.

Jon Hamlin (MS ’97) of Jacksonville, Fla., died June 3, 2007. Hamlin was a systems engineer for the Bank of America and a member of the Baptist faith. He is survived by his mother, brothers and many loved ones.

Joseph Andrews (BBA ’98) of Atlanta died March 8. He received his bachelor’s degree in finance from UGA in 1998 and was the vice president of pricing products and services for MedAssets, a health care consulting company. He is survived by his wife of 8 years, Sara, and their son.

Walker E. Atrice III (M ’99) of Fairburn, died March 22.

2000–2004

Karen Joy “Ji Shin” Bartlett (PhD ’00) died in August. Before receiving her Ph.D. in English literature from the University of Georgia, Bartlett graduated from N.C. State University with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English literature. She later taught creative writing to students using English as a second language and received an Excellence in Teaching award during the 1999-2000 school year. Bartlett was a lifelong Buddhist who was associated with many Zen centers and studied with Mitsunen Lou Nordstrom for 14 years. She enjoyed teaching, writing, poetry, gardening, cooking and Indian literature.

Chris Wallace (BSEd ’04) of Elberton died Oct. 24. After graduating from the University of Georgia with a degree in health and physical education, Wallace worked as a teacher at Hart County Academy and was voted Hart County Teacher of the Year for 2008. He was a farmer and a member of the Cokesbury United Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife, Katherine Harritos Wallace, his parents, George H. Wallace and Claire Cheek Wallace, and a brother, Caleb Wallace.

2005-

Rachel Aber (BBA ’05) of Woodstock died Oct. 20. Aber was an associate with Trimont Real Estate Advisors in Atlanta. She danced with the Woodstock School of Dance for over 10 years. She is survived by her parents, Larry and Donna Aber, her brother, Derek Aber, and many loved ones.

Charles R. Smallen (BBA ’05) of Bethlehem died suddenly Sept. 9. Smallen was a lifelong resident of the metro Atlanta area and was a builder in the residential construction market. He is survived by his parents, Gary and Mary Smallen.

Mark Duello (BBA ’06) of Snellville, died Feb. 25, at age 25. He was a proud graduate of UGA, having earned his bachelor’s degree in risk management and insurance in 2006. Duello lived life to the fullest and enjoyed water skiing, tubing and kayaking.